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Old 03-29-2013, 10:00 PM   #1
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Default Adding Coffee to IPA: How do you cold extract?

Already made two home brews with a group of friends. They both turned out great, but now we want to step it up.

We're getting a kit for an Imperial IPA which will be 8.2% ABV. I have a bag of decaf Starbucks coffee and would like to add this to the initial cook to make (ta-da) a Coffee IPA.

I honestly don't know how to do to cold extraction. Any tips? Also how much coffee should we brew for approx 5 Gallons of beer?

Apologies if this has been asked before but we're brewing tomorrow night -- I have to get the extract ready later this evening.

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Old 03-30-2013, 12:05 AM   #2
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Yuck. There is a reason you don't see too many commercial examples of Coffee IPAs. Bad move IMO.

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Old 03-30-2013, 12:14 AM   #3
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Brew the regular beer. Cold steep the coffee at bottling time. Then you can pull out a MEASURED sample. Add a measured amount of the coffee extract until you like it. Do the math up to your full batch size. To reduce contamination I would boil the water you are going to use to cold steep(then seal and allow it to cool in fridge) or if you are extra paranoid, you could use sulfate tabs like they do for wine.
PS. I agree that it will probably ruin an otherwise delicious IPA. But if you like it...that's what homebrewing is about.

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Old 03-30-2013, 12:16 AM   #4
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Stone Dayman Coffee IPA was ok - kinda in the same vein as a black ipa/cda/etc but the coffee came off as stale to me. splitting a 22 was more than enough for me

I read (possibly here) that they steep the beans in the beer (not wort). hops were cascade and citra. I think it would work much better with non PNW fruity/citrusy hops.

you def want to use a light roast and error on the side of too little

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Old 03-30-2013, 07:06 AM   #5
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I agree with terrapinj that the Stone Dayman IPA was OK. Initially I thought it was great, but after the excitement faded the flaws started to shine through, particularly as the beer warmed.

In my opinion too much acid came out of the coffee, possibly due to brewing method. It almost tasted of burnt coffee which is probably why you get the sense it was an overly dark roasted bean, even that stale taste.

Personally though, I think you could do a dark roast successfully in an IPA but it would have to be cold brewed to avoid the astringent and even stale/burnt coffee taste.

I plan to make a similar IPA but with coldbrewed coffee. To cold brew, I take about 1.25lbs of coarse, freshly ground coffee beans and steep for 12-16 hours in fresh, filtered drinking water - about 9 cups. The longer you steep, the more acidity you get out of the beans in my experience and I tend to prefer my cold brew steeped 14-16 hours (usually 14). Can I really taste the difference? I think so... But I could just be convincing myself. I definitely feel that cold brew allows you to get full coffee flavor with a more smooth finish and decreased acidity overall compared to hot brewing.

When brewed this way you can have a regular strength cup of coffee at 3:1 water:coffee ratio or espresso at 1:1 ratio. I usually mix my coffee extract with hot water from my water bar. I would experiment with coffee "extract" addition when racking to the bottling bucket and just do a little at a time until you get where you want with the coffee flavor.

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Old 03-30-2013, 02:29 PM   #6
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I actually just did this. Split a 5 gallon batch and added 2oz of cold brewed coffee when bottling. To cold brew, I ground the coffee beans and added it to a little over 2 cups of hot water. Let that sit in my French press for 24 hours on the counter with saranwrap over the top. I used the French press just so it was easier to filter out the grounds. Initial flavor was good, can't wait to try it carb'd in about 2 weeks

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Old 03-31-2013, 09:27 PM   #7
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I dont meant to be that *guy* but using hot water negates the point of cold brewing. You still release the acids and tannins from the coffee. A true cold brew uses cold to room temperature water.

What type of roast did you use Brez? I'm tend to prefer dark roasts, particularly french roast but I've been seeing many use blondes lately.

I am eager to make my own version of a coffee IPA, but with 5 carboys going steadily right now I'm waiting to start transferring a few to secondary in about a week before I start new batches. As a result, I have one lonely carboy waiting for liquid goodness!

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Old 04-01-2013, 12:16 AM   #8
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http://www.americastestkitchenfeed.c...d-brew-coffee/

That is a good link that dissects cold brewing coffee. When I was making my vanilla/coffee stout I read up on cold brew and ultimately used that link.
I agree with the last couple folks...using hot water negates the whole concept of cold brewed.

Happy Brewing.
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Old 04-01-2013, 12:29 AM   #9
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Heres a link to my thread with an AG recipe I just came up with. I modeled it after Aleman/Two Brothers/Stone Dayman collaboration. I havent brewed it yet, but hopefully it will be a little maltier, and have less astringency/burnt/stale coffee flavor.

The coffee addition I noted is just an estimate. On bottling day I will add to taste.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/help...8/#post5063066

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