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badlee 01-02-2013 03:37 AM

acidulated malt in Porter
 
So..... I will have a small amount of acidulated malt(500gr) mid month when my dad comes to visit and have wanted to do a porter for quite some time.
I would be looking at a wimpy OG of no more that 1045 I think.
Things I have or will have; 3kg MO
500gr acid malt
500gr med. crystal
loads of black and chocolate malt
roasted barley

for yeast I have(0r will have available) s-04, s-33 and Brett B trois
Anyone have any ideas on a recipe formulation for me?
Cheers very much
Lee

chumpsteak 01-02-2013 03:53 AM

Why are you adding acidulated malt to a Porter? Your mash pH should be plenty low without adding additional acid. Are you trying to give the beer a sour taste?

badlee 01-02-2013 04:11 AM

yup, a sour twang is what I am trying to get.
I will never go down the road of a sour mash again after the terrible things it did to my house(not to mention my relationship with thr Mrs!)

MVKTR2 01-02-2013 04:33 AM

I don't say this from experience so take it with a grain of salt. However the literature on the subject suggest using 1-1.5% acid malt in the grist of some guinness stout clones. Thus if you're looking for more twang than that you could double it to 3% or if you're a truly brave soul 4.5%.

Also adding too much could mess up the pH of your mash so I'd wait till the 45 minute mark then add in the acid malt and let it sit for 30 more minutes. This way it won't interfere with your mash process but you'll be able to get acid from the mash process.

My $.02, worth almost as much!

bierhaus15 01-02-2013 05:00 AM

I've used acid malt a fair amount in the past for water adjustment in lagers and 1-3% really isn't enough to give a discernible tartness. If you want twang, go higher towards 6-7% and that might still not be enough.

ShackNasty 01-02-2013 06:22 AM

I recently brewed a dry stout (Guinness-esk if you will), in which I added 1% acidulated malt to the grist. There was definitely a sourness to it that was easily perceivable, but not so much so that it didn't taste because in all honesty I loved it! Some will suggest that any sourness you get from acidulated malt is just a figment of one's imagination, but I do not buy into this. There was definitely a "sour twang," and I liked it a lot. The stout I brewed was also on the lower gravity end and I only used 1oz acid malt for a 3 gal batch. This is just my experience with it. I say go for it.

badlee 01-02-2013 12:30 PM

From what i saw on the weyermann site, they recomend 8% for a berliner weisse. That would probably be too much, so was thinking 3.5%-5%.
Now it gets hard:hopping. I have some chinook,saaz, northern brewer and ekg(1oz) some fuggle and tettnenger 2oz.
I have to be hard on my self here,otherwise i will just hop the hell out of it.

chumpsteak 01-03-2013 08:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ShackNasty (Post 4737221)
I recently brewed a dry stout (Guinness-esk if you will), in which I added 1% acidulated malt to the grist. There was definitely a sourness to it that was easily perceivable, but not so much so that it didn't taste because in all honesty I loved it! Some will suggest that any sourness you get from acidulated malt is just a figment of one's imagination, but I do not buy into this. There was definitely a "sour twang," and I liked it a lot. The stout I brewed was also on the lower gravity end and I only used 1oz acid malt for a 3 gal batch. This is just my experience with it. I say go for it.

I'd be willing to bet your sour or tart taste was more likely from the roasted malts. 1% is almost nothing.

badlee 01-04-2013 12:23 AM

yeh, I got that feeling too.
I was thinking 4% or maybe 5% to be very daring!

badlee 01-04-2013 12:33 PM

Bump
Any ideas for me on formulation?
Doesnt need to be porter per se, just a dark side brew.


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