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Old 09-06-2011, 03:51 AM   #1
bengerman
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Default 1829 recipe pseudo-clone

so, that darn Bob got me reading some historical brewing stuff.
and i came across a brew record for what they were calling a porter.
i did a bunch of mathing out and uneducated guessing to create this:

EDIT: the book is from 1829, the original batch was brewed in the year 1800

12.11.1800- Brown Porter
================================================== ==============================
Batch Size: 3.000 gal
Boil Size: 4.050 gal
Boil Time: 1.500 hr
Efficiency: 75%
OG: 1.042
FG: 1.010
ABV: 4.1%
Bitterness: 32.1 IBUs (Tinseth)
Color: 23 SRM (Morey)

Fermentables
================================================== ==============================
Name Type Amount Mashed Late Yield Color
Brown Malt (British Chocolate) Grain 2.250 lb Yes No 70% 65 L
Pale Malt (2 Row) UK Grain 2.500 lb Yes No 78% 3 L
Total grain: 4.750 lb

Hops
================================================== ==============================
Name Alpha Amount Use Time Form IBU
Galena 12.0% 0.600 oz First Wort 1.000 hr Pellet 32.1

Yeast
================================================== ==============================
Name Type Form Amount Stage
Wyeast - British Ale II Ale Liquid 0.528 cup Primary

Mash
================================================== ==============================
Name Type Amount Target Time
mash Infusion 2.750 gal 150.000 F 1.000 hr
sparge Infusion 2.250 gal 165.000 F 15.000 min




I intend to brew it BIAB style (unless someone wan't to ship me a sweet 3-tier setup for free....)


looking for feedback, does it look good, what yeast should i use and what hops should i use (the original recipe just had "hops" and "yeast")



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Old 09-06-2011, 01:38 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bengerman View Post

looking for feedback, does it look good, what yeast should i use and what hops should i use (the original recipe just had "hops" and "yeast")
Goldings are the hops to go for.

Where is the recipe from? 1042 is a very low gravity for a beer of that period.


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Old 09-06-2011, 07:01 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patto1ro

Goldings are the hops to go for.

Where is the recipe from? 1042 is a very low gravity for a beer of that period.
The recipe is from an 1829 book called "the art of brewing"
I can link to it when I get home.

There was a detail I found after posting this that I may be able to use to find his OG.
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Old 09-06-2011, 07:37 PM   #4
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How was the gravity given? I'd expect it to be in brewers pounds.

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Old 09-07-2011, 03:55 AM   #5
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well, they gave the grav. in pounds, but separately for each wort, which were then blended, but they do not give the gravity of total batch, pre or post boil.
for the pre-boil, would it be as simple as multiplying the gravities by their respective worts, adding the products, and then dividing by the total volume of wort?

EDIT: if my above formula is correct, the total post-boil gravity is 1.049, so he either has better efficiency or more boil loss.

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Old 09-07-2011, 05:37 AM   #6
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as promised, here's the source of the recipe, page 48 of the PDF

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Old 09-07-2011, 08:14 AM   #7
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I don't think you've got the quantities right. Quarters are a volume measurement and because brown malt was lighter, you get fewer pounds of it to a quarter than pale malt.

brew size: 50 imperial barrels (1,800 imperial gallons)
5.5 quarters Brown malt @ 256 lbs per quarter = 1408 lbs
6.5 quarters pale malt @ 336 lbs per quarter = 2184 lbs
total 3,592 lbs
108 lbs hops

You're right that the gravity of the combined worts isn't given. But it's easy enough to work out. The bottom of column 10 gives the total post-boil volume - 50 barrels. And the bottom of column 12 gives the total number of brewers pound - 873. Divide 873 by 50 and you get the gravity of the beer - 17.46 brewers pounds or 1048.4º.

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Old 09-07-2011, 04:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patto1ro View Post
I don't think you've got the quantities right. Quarters are a volume measurement and because brown malt was lighter, you get fewer pounds of it to a quarter than pale malt.

brew size: 50 imperial barrels (1,800 imperial gallons)
5.5 quarters Brown malt @ 256 lbs per quarter = 1408 lbs
6.5 quarters pale malt @ 336 lbs per quarter = 2184 lbs
total 3,592 lbs
108 lbs hops

You're right that the gravity of the combined worts isn't given. But it's easy enough to work out. The bottom of column 10 gives the total post-boil volume - 50 barrels. And the bottom of column 12 gives the total number of brewers pound - 873. Divide 873 by 50 and you get the gravity of the beer - 17.46 brewers pounds or 1048.4º.
i realized the quarters were volume, i just hadn't realized that the pale/brown malt had different weights. I only had a weight conversion for bushel => lbs "malt"

thank you, and i did the gravity calculations last night and that's what i got too.

i think my volume calculations were off too.
i was figuring 45 gal in a barrel, which i mathed out from where they were talking about gravities earlier and said that a barrel of pure water was 360 lbs. and since "a pint's a pound the world around" that worked out to 45. (notice on a second reading that they explicitly state that a brrel is 36 gallons. D'oh)

what you have puts it at 43.2 gallons/barrel, so that's another place my gravity got skewed.



EDIT: new rough recipe:
porter finalish - Brown Porter
================================================== ==============================
Batch Size: 3.000 gal
Boil Size: 4.050 gal
Boil Time: 1.500 hr
Efficiency: 75%
OG: 1.048
FG: 1.012
ABV: 4.6%
Bitterness: 31.3 IBUs (Tinseth)
Color: 21 SRM (Morey)

Fermentables
================================================== ==============================
Name Type Amount Mashed Late Yield Color
Brown Malt (British Chocolate) Grain 2.000 lb Yes No 70% 65 L
Pale Malt (2 Row) UK Grain 3.250 lb Yes No 78% 3 L
Total grain: 5.250 lb

Hops
================================================== ==============================
Name Alpha Amount Use Time Form IBU
Galena 12.0% 0.600 oz First Wort 1.000 hr Pellet 31.3

Yeast
================================================== ==============================
Name Type Form Amount Stage
Wyeast - British Ale II Ale Liquid 0.528 cup Primary

Mash
================================================== ==============================
Name Type Amount Target Time
mash Infusion 2.750 gal 150.000 F 1.000 hr
sparge Infusion 2.250 gal 165.000 F 15.000 min
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Old 09-08-2011, 04:57 AM   #9
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So it's in the fermenter with a few tweaks.
Upped the hops to 1 oz, the sparge/2nd mash went 30 minutes instead of 10.


Missed my pre and post boil volumes, so I have 4 gal of 1.044 rather than 3 gal of 1.048.

Oh well. It will still be beer.



In other news, it has been named. It is "proto-porter"



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