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Old 12-29-2010, 03:55 AM   #1
jlangs
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Default Why can't Blichmann NG burner be used indoors?

Hi,

I've read a lot of posts, but just don't understand why a blichmann burner using natural gas isnt safe to use indoors. I've read that these types of burners weren't meant for indoors because they are too high in BTUs which use more O2 and give off more CO2. But I've found higher BTU stock pot ranges that are meant for indoor use (like this one at 90,000 BTU: http://www.katom.com/386-SPSH18NG.html). So why wouldn't the blichmann be safe to use inside - it's only 60,000 BTU when using natural gas? Is it really more of a disclaimer thing than a real risk? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

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Old 12-29-2010, 04:20 AM   #2
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You can use whatever burner you want indoors with proper ventilation.

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Old 12-29-2010, 05:16 AM   #3
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It's not CO2 it's CO. It's deadly serious.

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Old 12-29-2010, 05:27 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Conroe View Post
It's not CO2 it's CO. It's deadly serious.
Lol, BIG difference!
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:32 AM   #5
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have a hood vent right above you brewing and you can do what ever you want, but brewing in doors using an NG burner with out a hood vent is asking for trouble.

just in the news was a story about some kids having a bad battery and went to a birthday party and parked in the garage with the car running to keep the battery from dying or some thing like that. well they were not in the garage, but upstairs and the carbon-dioxide made its way into the house and a couple people died.

-=Jason=-

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Old 12-29-2010, 05:45 AM   #6
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I say go for it. Can I have the burners if it doesn't work out well?

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Old 12-29-2010, 07:27 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earwig View Post
You can use whatever burner you want indoors with proper ventilation.
100% true, but know what you are doing before you bring gas and fire inside. If you have a slow propane leak from your tanks in the garage and then go out for a smoke a few days later... nice knowing you!
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Old 12-29-2010, 08:05 AM   #8
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It's a general disclaimer for liability reasons. Natural gas or propane makes no difference regarding CO danger. Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion which is usually caused by a lack of oxygen at the burner.

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Old 12-29-2010, 01:21 PM   #9
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1 - Set the flame as lean as you can (open the intake vent as far as possible) be sure the flame has no yellow or orange on it

2 - get a CO monitor

3 - leave a window open

4 - enjoy

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Old 12-29-2010, 02:45 PM   #10
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I thought NG only gave off CO2, while LP was the one that creates CO. (But I did know in large quantities even CO2 wasn't good)

It sounds like as long as I take some precatuations - CO monitor, fan exhaust, open window - that the risks should be relatively similar to normal cooking with gas inside the home.

I appreciate all of the feedback.

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