The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > What'll it take to move from extract?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-24-2007, 10:02 PM   #1
massappeal120
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Valley/salt Lake utah (yeah I know our alcohol laws are absurd i live here)
Posts: 25
Default What'll it take to move from extract?

I just started brewing and want to get my feet under me before I try more advanced brewing techniques, so for my gfirst few batches I will be using extract, but eventually I want to move beyond this. So I guess I just got a few questions,


What is the difference between, Mash, mini mash, all grains, and partial grain brewing. I dont really understand this at all?

What is the better of these techniques

What kind of extra equipment will I need in adition to my ale gear ( primary fermenter, bottling bucket, secondary fermenter, wort chiller, kettle, bottles, capper)?

How hard is it, vs how rewarding is it?

Is it hard to get grains? nevermind just looked on my shops websigte they have non extract grains.

is it cheeper or more expensive?

__________________
massappeal120 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2007, 10:06 PM   #2
Brewing Clamper
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewing Clamper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Union City, CA
Posts: 2,862
Liked 16 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

To paraphrase a recent discussion, read www.howtohomebrew.com and you shall have all your answers.

__________________

--Omar

4 Ohms Aleworks & Lagers | Twitter | Facebook | Blog |

Brewing Clamper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2007, 11:22 PM   #3
beerdad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 143
Default

Going all grain requires extra equipment. It will save a lot of money. Mini mash should make better beer than extract and doesn't require any additional equipment, but doesn't really save you any money. Read the info from the link above it explains it all really well.

__________________

Primary #1 Panty Dropper Cider
Primary #2 Honey Brown Ale
Primary #3 Scottish Ale
Secondary #1 Empty
Secondary #2 Panty Dropper Cider
Secondary #3 Empty
Secondary #4 Empty
Bottled European Ale, Corona Clone, Raspberry White Zinfandel, Old English 800 Clone
Drinking Double IPA
More Double IPA it was great!

beerdad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2007, 12:52 AM   #4
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 97 Times on 91 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

The simplest method of brewing is to use just extract. While this can produce some reasonable beers, they often have very little body or flavor.

The next step up is to use some steeping grains. This involves steeping some crushed specialty grains (usually crystal malt) in hot water, then rinsing the grains to extract the color and flavor, and using the colored and flavored water to make an extract brew. This gives a lot more control over the brewing process in terms of color, flavor, and body. It requires a little more time, but no new equipment. In my opinion, the extra time to steep and rinse the grains is well worth it.

The next step up is to do a partial mash. This involves using some crushed base malt (typically 2 row) and "mashing" in water at 150 - 158 degrees. (You can also add specialty grains to the base malt.) Mashing is just a fancy word for steeping, or soaking, but with the mash, the temperature is more important than with steeping specialty grains. The big difference is that the mash converts the starch in the base malt into sugars by using enzymes that are naturally present in the malt. After the mash is completed (about 60 minutes) you "sparge" the grain. Sparge is a fancy word for rinse. The purpose of the sparge is to rinse all the sugars out of the grain/water mixture (the mash) The more base grains you use, the more important it is to sparge properly, otherwise you are just wasting time and money in mashing base grains that don't contribute anything to the "wort". Wort is just a fancy word for the liquid collected after sparging your grains. With the partial mash, you collect some sugars from the grains, so you can reduce the amount of extract that you need to add. Extract is simply grains that have been mashed and sparged to produce a wort which is then either freeze dried to produce DME or concentrated to produce LME.

Finally, All Grain is the extreme form of partial mash where you don't add any extract (hence All Grain). To do this effectively, you need to collect about 6.5g wort and boil it for at least 60 minutes (which requires a large kettle and good heat source), and you also require larger and more sophisticated mashing and sparging vessels. This method gives you the maximum control over the beer, and also requires more equipment. Grain is cheaper than extract as extract started off as grain which was then mashed, sparged, and dried or concentrated, so the more grain you use in a brew, the cheaper it is.

-a.

__________________
ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2007, 03:10 AM   #5
Kevin Dean
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Kevin Dean's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Frederick, MD
Posts: 1,377
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by massappeal120
What is the better of these techniques
That depends on what is important to you. If you have a lot of spare time and extra space in your house/apartment then all-grain would probably be "best". If you've got limited space or want "quicker" beer, then some form of extract brewing is probably better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by massappeal120
How hard is it, vs how rewarding is it?
That's something only you can decide. I myself need to kill time and I brew because I like the crafting aspect of brewing. I bought my first piece of equipment with plans to move to all-grain. But your reasons for brewing may not be the same as mine so the amount of return you get on all-grain or partial mash might be totally different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by massappeal120
Is it hard to get grains? nevermind just looked on my shops websigte they have non extract grains.
It's as easy to get grains as extract and grains are cheaper pound for pound.

Quote:
Originally Posted by massappeal120
is it cheeper or more expensive?
All-grain requires more investment up front. You need a mash/lauter tun at the least, a larger kettle, a stronger heat source (usually). Unless you buy in small batches and have it milled at purchase you'll need a grain mill which, for some people, is the single most expensive piece of equipment they buy.

So if you brew 5 times a year, that equipment might not be worth the expense. If you brew on a weekly basis the equipment pays for itself after less than a year in savings from buying grains vs extract.

You can make good, even award winning, beers with extract and specialty grains (which has been explained by another poster) and even non-specialty grain recipies will give you a more flavourful beer that is sold in most restaurants.
__________________
Free State Project liaison to the homebrew hobby!

"What's your name? Well my mom calls me Son, and my cat calls me Meow, either will do." -- Sam Dodson of the Obscured Truth Network
Kevin Dean is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2007, 03:54 AM   #6
bigben
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: My House
Posts: 522
Default

It requires the ability to read stickies and use the search function

There's tons of info on this site alone, you just gotta look. But of course never be afraid to ask a question(just maybe read up a little first)

http://howtobrew.com/intro.html

__________________
bigben is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2007, 04:34 PM   #7
massappeal120
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Valley/salt Lake utah (yeah I know our alcohol laws are absurd i live here)
Posts: 25
Default

Thanks everyone. howtobrew has been a very interesting read, with a lot of godo ideas and helpful info. all your suggestions were very helpful. onelove.

__________________
massappeal120 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2007, 04:41 PM   #8
olllllo
[]-O-[]
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
olllllo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 13,514
Liked 123 Times on 104 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

Then there's the matter of your AG license.
You can PayPal me the $200.00.

I also accept cash.

__________________
Rabbit And Coyote Schwag
Rob - Phoenix Ambassador to Milwaukee
Where did your avatar go?
Ginger Beer for Moscow Mules Bacon Vodka
Twitter
olllllo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2007, 05:08 PM   #9
bigben
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: My House
Posts: 522
Default

And paypal me the $50 processing fees.

__________________
bigben is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When is it time to move on to mini mash from extract? justin22 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 06-20-2009 06:46 AM
Move on to partial grain or one more extract kit? jbolte1976 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 04-14-2009 06:44 PM
Move to Large Batch Extract or All Grain pinarphan General Techniques 7 01-31-2009 02:07 AM
Considering move from Extract to PM Diablotastic All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 15 08-23-2008 02:45 PM
What'll it be? I'll have what your having.. Benny Blanco Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 19 12-03-2007 10:48 PM