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Old 02-12-2008, 01:27 PM   #1
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Default What do I need to make a Double CO2 regulator

I am getting to the point where I dont want to have just one pressure coming out of my tank. It takes too long to carb under 10 psi, and it is too much of a pain to serve over 10. So, I need a double CO2 regulator. Of course, I could go to NB or somewhere and buy one for $150, but I know some folks have made them in the past, and they sure dont look that complicated, but I dont know what parts I would need and/or where I would get them.

Any tips or advice would be great. Thanks.



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Old 02-12-2008, 03:18 PM   #2
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Depends on which way you want to go. If you don't mind having two regulators hanging off your tank, you just buy a second regulator (single-gauge, if your existing reg is already dual-gauge) and the threaded pipe nipple that connects the two together - most likely a 1/4" NPT, but you need to make sure if you need right-handed or left-handed threads. Here's an example of such a piece, in longer or shorter versions depending on how your regulator is sized/shaped:
http://www.beveragefactory.com/draftbeer/regulator/component/618BL.shtml
http://www.beveragefactory.com/draftbeer/regulator/component/618B.shtml

If you want to run just one regulator on the tank and then use two secondary regulators for the two keg pressures, just buy a dual secondary regulator like this:
http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-beer/regulators-pid-3022.html



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Old 02-12-2008, 03:37 PM   #3
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Hmmm. I didnt know I had those options. So, (forgive my ignorance) for the first option, I already have the dual gauge regulator, if I unscrewed the gauge that tells me how much gas I have left, and then added another piece, and then attached the gauge that tells me how much gas is left, then I would essentially have a dual output regulator? What is the piece that I would attach to it, would it be one of these.

This is the regulator that I have now.

I appreciate your help on this. As I am sure you can tell, I have never done anything like this.

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Old 02-12-2008, 03:53 PM   #4
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I'm a n00b on this kegging business, but you also have the option of selling your single regulator on craigslist/eBay/etc. and purchasing a new dual reg. It would certainly be cleaner and simpler than the roundabout way discussed above and might be cheaper depending on how much you get for your regulator on the secondary market.

You don't need to spend $150, either. I got this one from kegconnection.com for $99. It should arrive Thursday.

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XX: Moss Hollow Springs Sparkling Water 95: Gott Mit Uns German Pils 91b: Brown Willie's Oaked Abbey Ale 103: Merkin Stout
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Old 02-12-2008, 03:58 PM   #5
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I got my double regulator from http://www.micromatic.com/

They seem to make a quality, rebuildable regulator, and they sell double regulators as well.

Very helpful on the phone, reasonable prices, excellent hand-adjustable and lockable knob on the front. And they are pretty. :-)



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Old 02-12-2008, 04:44 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cubbies
Hmmm. I didnt know I had those options. So, (forgive my ignorance) for the first option, I already have the dual gauge regulator, if I unscrewed the gauge that tells me how much gas I have left, and then added another piece, and then attached the gauge that tells me how much gas is left, then I would essentially have a dual output regulator? What is the piece that I would attach to it, would it be one of these.

This is the regulator that I have now.

I appreciate your help on this. As I am sure you can tell, I have never done anything like this.
Yes, you would attach another primary regulator body to with with a piece of NIP piping, then in the empty port you would add your CO2 tank gauge to it. Then you would end up with a two different pressures.

Or, like someone else mentioned, you could have a secondary regulator body. Purchase secondary regulator bodies, low pressure gauges, connecting piping and out-valves and you'll have an infinitely expandable secondary regulators. If, perhaps you have 6 kegs, you can purchase additional bodies for each of them and theoretically carb/dispense 6 different kegs at 6 different pressures.

American Science Surplus has secondary regulator bodies for sale for $5.75 a piece. Additional low-pressure gauges cost about $6-$8 apiece and the valves cost about $6-$8 apiece. You could build a 4 body secondary regulator for under $100.
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Old 02-12-2008, 06:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan!
It would certainly be cleaner and simpler than the roundabout way discussed above
I guess if you're really averse to DIY, then sure, but the "roundabout" way is exactly how the typical commercial dual regulators are made, so it's really not any less clean or simple, aside from the simple matter of assembling it - for example, looking at the one you linked to, it's obvious that it's the same as the single regulators sold at the same site, connected with a 1/4" pipe nipple - and judging by the use of teflon tape instead of liquid thread sealant (like loctite) I'd hazard a guess that they assemble them that way themselves. You may also notice that kegconnection.com also sells a "CO2 regulator, add a body" which is what I described (single-gauge reg with pipe nipple) which allows you to add an additional reg to an existing setup.

For a cost comparison, you could buy two nice dual-gauge regs with knobs, plus the pipe nipple, for $81 from beveragefactory.com - and you could save even more if you went with cheaper 'economy' regulators - which makes it cheaper than the pre-made dual regulators I've seen.

Literally, all you do is unscrew a gauge, screw the regs together with the pipe nipple, and screw the gauge back in. Done in just a minute or two with nothing more complicated than a wrench and some teflon tape (or preferably, loctite).

IMHO, a dual secondary regulator is a smarter way to go in most cases, albeit not the cheapest of options... You'll have the convenience of being able to mount your secondary regs anywhere you want, so you can easily access them to view and change pressures.
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Old 02-12-2008, 07:14 PM   #8
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If I was to buy this

a) which connector nipple would I require?
b) just so I understand the process, I would remove the brass barb on the left, and the brass nut on the right. I would also remove the pressure gauge on the left side of my existing regulator (all disconnected from the gas obviously). Then, on my existing regulator, I would attach one end of the nipple with teflon tape. On the other end of the nipple connector would be the secondary regulator, connected on the right side where the brass nut used to be; also with teflon tape. Then, on the left side of the secondary regulator I would attach the pressure gauge with teflon tape, then hook to gas and check for leaks. Does that sound correct?

I looked at the CO2 Regulator, add a a body, but it is $5 more than buying the pieces and putting them together. Not that $5 is that big of a deal, but if it is as easy as I have described above, why not do it myself?

Thanks for your advice, and if you could answer those two questions I promise you I wont bug you anymore.

Thanks.

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Old 02-12-2008, 07:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Funkenjaeger
I guess if you're really averse to DIY, then sure, but the "roundabout" way is exactly how the typical commercial dual regulators are made, so it's really not any less clean or simple, aside from the simple matter of assembling it - for example, looking at the one you linked to, it's obvious that it's the same as the single regulators sold at the same site, connected with a 1/4" pipe nipple - and judging by the use of teflon tape instead of liquid thread sealant (like loctite) I'd hazard a guess that they assemble them that way themselves. You may also notice that kegconnection.com also sells a "CO2 regulator, add a body" which is what I described (single-gauge reg with pipe nipple) which allows you to add an additional reg to an existing setup.

For a cost comparison, you could buy two nice dual-gauge regs with knobs, plus the pipe nipple, for $81 from beveragefactory.com - and you could save even more if you went with cheaper 'economy' regulators - which makes it cheaper than the pre-made dual regulators I've seen.

Literally, all you do is unscrew a gauge, screw the regs together with the pipe nipple, and screw the gauge back in. Done in just a minute or two with nothing more complicated than a wrench and some teflon tape (or preferably, loctite).

IMHO, a dual secondary regulator is a smarter way to go in most cases, albeit not the cheapest of options... You'll have the convenience of being able to mount your secondary regs anywhere you want, so you can easily access them to view and change pressures.
I stand corrected. After looking around MicroMatic's site, it looks like they're designed to be daisy-chained. Did I mention that I'm a kegging n00b and have never actually kegged a batch?
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.planned:
•Scottish 80/- •Sweet Stout •Roggenbier
.primary | bright:
98: Moss Hollow Soured '09 72: Oude Kriek 99: B-Weisse 102: Brett'd BDSA 104: Feat of Strength Helles Bock 105: Merkin Brown
.on tap | kegged:
XX: Moss Hollow Springs Sparkling Water 95: Gott Mit Uns German Pils 91b: Brown Willie's Oaked Abbey Ale 103: Merkin Stout
98: Yorkshire Special 100: Maple Porter 89: Cidre Saison 101: Steffiweizen '09 (#3)
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Old 02-13-2008, 01:44 AM   #10
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At second glance, it seems what I just said hinges quite significantly on whether the threads are left-handed or right-handed. Looking online, it seems that a lot of regulators use LHT for the high-pressure ports. The pipe nipples used to connect regulators together don't specify LHT or RHT, but from pictures they appear to be RHT.

The "add a body" regulator at kegconnection doesn't state whether it's RHT or LHT, but from the picture it sort of looks like RHT, which leads me to think that it's kind of a crap shoot as to whether it's LHT or RHT.

While in theory it wouldn't make a huge difference either way, in practice, it doesn't appear that obtaining a LHT pipe nipple is quite as easy as one might expect.

If yours has left-hand threads on the outlet, unless there is an easy source of LHT pipe nipples, you are probably better off buying a dual secondary regulator, or doing as Evan! suggested and buying a premade dual primary and selling your old one.



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