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Old 07-30-2011, 04:53 PM   #1
JayWeezie
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Default Transfering from BK to carboy???

Is there a process for transferring from my BK to a carboy that works? My funnel with the mesh screen over it seems like it will just clog to quickly. Using a racking cane seems like it wouldnt get it all.

Im trying to save a step by not using my bottling bucket to transfer after the boil.

What your process???

Extract brews. 5gl batches

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Old 07-30-2011, 05:13 PM   #2
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A kettle should have a ball valve in it, otherwise it's just a pot... I converted my 8 gallon aluminum stock pot into a brew kettle many batches back, and simply used 1/2" silicon tubing to transfer from kettle to fermenter. Transfer takes less than two minutes (often under 90 seconds).

If you don't have a kettle, but have a pot, then you'll either need to scoop and use the funnel (you don't need the screen if you don't want, just means more trub in the bottom once it's all done) or rack into it. I've also been using nylon bags for my hops, to reduce trub in the kettle, and into fermenter. Makes it much easier to transfer...

Personally, I'm now using a plate chiller, so I don't scoop/pour anything into primary. Simply connect everything up (pump gets it's cherry popped next batch) and let it flow. Adjust ball valves to obtain my desired temp into primary (wort is boiling hot going into the plate chiller) and I'm done. Hit it with some pure O2 via the stone wand, pitch the yeast, and let it ride until it's time to bottle/keg it up.

BTW, how many batches in are you? I switched from extract after my first three. One partial mash batch, then went all grain. Loving all grain brewing. Sure, it takes longer (I mash the grain, not paying for someone else to have done it for me) but IMO (and many others) I get better brew from the method. Of course, I probably enjoy the recipe control even more. I no longer need to wonder about what the manufacturer of the extract put into his product.

For reference:
My kettle(s):


Three of my four primaries:


BEER PORN!

Yes, I do label up the kegs and bottles... Laser printer (color), regular paper, and a glue stick is all I need.

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Old 07-30-2011, 07:53 PM   #3
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Im 20 batches in. Im ready to go all grain just do t have the extra 100 or so dollars its gonna tale to get up and running. ie cooler, valves, manifolds, keggle...

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Old 07-31-2011, 04:18 PM   #4
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I chill in the boil kettle/pot, then aerate in same. After aeration, I whirlpool and let sit for an hour. After that, I use my autosiphon and get clear wort into the carboy. No funnel or strainer necessary.

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Old 07-31-2011, 04:37 PM   #5
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I chill in the boil kettle, then pour it in to my bottling bucket that is lined with a 5 gal paint strainer bag, this filters all the hop & trub. Since I now keg I needed to find a use for this bucket! Open the spigot & let it splash into my better bottle.

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Old 07-31-2011, 04:40 PM   #6
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I brew at my buddy's place (a$$hole LL prevents me from brewing where I currently live) so the hour rest simply wouldn't work for me. IF I needed it that is. Since I do long primaries, I've not had any clarity issues in my batches. Since going to the plate chiller, my brew days is just a bit shorter. Since going to using pure O2 in primary (before pitching the yeast) it's been much easier on my old back. Also, since moving to pure O2, the batches have been much cleaner tasting. Once I add a flow meter to the O2 setup, I'll KNOW how much O2 is actually going into the wort, so I'll be able to calculate the PPM accurately.

As for the hardware cost of going all grain... You could give the BIAB method a shot. I did that with my earlier all grain batches. If you have decent sized pots/kettles, then you just need a grain bag, or two (have a spare on hand)... My brew buddy does that with a pair of 5 gallon pots. Of course, it does limit you to how much grain you can mash at one time, but at least you'll be on your way. It would also let you save up towards the additional hardware to be able to brew bigger beers.

Oh, and unless you have some sources that we don't know about, it's going to be more than "100 or so dollars" to get all the hardware you listed. You could do a cooler conversion (including buying a new cooler) for about $100. But a keggle is going to set you back more (unless you already have the 1/2 bbl keg, or got/get it for free). A keg mash tun isn't cheap either. Less than a Blichmann kettle of the same size, but still not cheap.

Whatever you end up doing, just keep brewing. Progress at the pace your comfortable with. BTW, I got my 8 gallon aluminum stock pot from a restaurant supply store. They have larger sizes on hand, typically, so you could go that route too if you wish. Just be sure to condition it before you use it for the first time for brewing (there's a sticky going over what to do)...

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Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
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Old 07-31-2011, 05:12 PM   #7
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Well, I would think if you have an auto siphon, I would use a chiller to cool your wort. Then start a whirlpool in the kettle, wait 20 minutes. While waiting sanitize your auto siphon. Use the auto siphon along the side of the kettle(the hops should be in a cone) to drain your wort. Simple and affordable.

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