Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Storing water filters between brew days
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-23-2010, 01:41 AM   #1
IDrinkBr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Aurora, IL
Posts: 102
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Storing water filters between brew days

I was wondering what anyone would recommend in terms of storing water filters between brew days. I was thinking about opening up the housing, pulling the filter and letting it dry. It seems to me that leaving water in the filter housing, with the filter, in my basement for at least 2-3 weeks between brews is probably not the best of ideas.

Thoughts?

__________________
IDrinkBr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2010, 01:47 AM   #2
homebeerbrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
homebeerbrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Home, where the beer is., Taxachusetts
Posts: 1,890
Liked 79 Times on 70 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

I don't know if this is the best way to do it, but I open the canister, dump the water, and set the filter and housing upside down on a small kitchen grate. I'm not sure what the grate was supposed to be originally, but I "acquired" it from one of the cabinets in the kitchen. SWMBO has seen me use it, but hasn't said anything. I'll leave it there until next brew day, at which time, I put it back together and run the water through it for a few minutes before using.

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulthenurse View Post
My taint is sore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DakotaRules View Post
... I just threw up on my wife.
homebeerbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2010, 01:52 AM   #3
Lonnie Mac
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bacliff, TX
Posts: 326
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by homebeerbrewer View Post
I don't know if this is the best way to do it, but I open the canister, dump the water, and set the filter and housing upside down on a small kitchen grate. I'm not sure what the grate was supposed to be originally, but I "acquired" it from one of the cabinets in the kitchen. SWMBO has seen me use it, but hasn't said anything. I'll leave it there until next brew day, at which time, I put it back together and run the water through it for a few minutes before using.
This is exactly what I do with my RO filters (3), except I keep them on a shelf that the wife gave me in the laundry room. I dismantle the whole system and store it in the cool AC until next use... My old single filter setup, I just drained and stored the whole thing in my deep freezer. I thawed it out before use. Actually it is still in the freezer today! I think this is a good practice if possible. Sits right next to my frozen Therminator in between uses.
__________________

Lonnie Mac...
President of the Brutus Ten cult!

Lonnie Mac is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2010, 01:57 AM   #4
homebeerbrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
homebeerbrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Home, where the beer is., Taxachusetts
Posts: 1,890
Liked 79 Times on 70 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Good, glad to hear that I'm not the only one. The second time I used it, I was afraid that it might be moldy, but looking at it I didn't see anything. I then ran the water for several minutes, then filled a clean glass to taste it. It tasted clean, so I decided that I was ok. I've been doing it the same way ever since.

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulthenurse View Post
My taint is sore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DakotaRules View Post
... I just threw up on my wife.
homebeerbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2010, 02:00 AM   #5
Catt22
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4,998
Liked 57 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

I disassemble the housing, remove the cartridge and gaskets. Rinse everything well with tap water and let it all air dry on a tray with my other miscellaneous small accessories, such as air locks and stoppers. I'm pretty sure that the carbon block cartridge would require about six months to dry out completely and possibly much longer than that, but I also think that this is about the best we can do and better than leaving the cartridge submerged in the housing for long periods.

__________________
Catt22 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2010, 06:47 AM   #6
bmckee56
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Coraopolis, PA (Near Pittsburgh)
Posts: 926
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Solid Carbon Block Filters

This technology has combined the incredible adsorption capability of carbon discussed previously with the ability of a solid brick of material to selectively strain out particles from water forced through it. The density of the brick determines how finely the water is cleaned. The better brands of this type of filter have a three part filter and are designed to prevent any possibility of "bypass" due to high pressure failure.
The following list of features are what combine to create the type of filter that will remove the widest range of possible contaminants in the drinking water:


Mechanical straining: the block of carbon mechanically strains out dirt, sediment, rust, algae, bacteria, microscopic worms, cryptosporidia and asbestos. This is all accomplished by water pressure so no electricity is required -- such a filter even works on a simple hand pump in emergencies!

Chemical bonding: As explained earlier, activated carbon bonds to thousands of chemicals. In fact, carbon will bond to most chemicals known to man! When water is forced through the solid carbon block, it is forced to slow down and increase the contact time with the carbon, allowing the carbon bonding to take place to remove the chemical pollutants like toxics, pesticides, THM's, chlorine, bad tastes, odors, etc.
Health-providing trace minerals like dissolved calcium and magnesium do not bond to carbon and are allowed to pass through, thereby retaining the health quality and good taste of the water.

Heavy metals like lead do not bond to the carbon, but are strained out by the pore size of the block -- basically like trying to fit a basketball down a hole designed for a ping pong ball!!


Prevention of bacterial growth: Bacteria are strained out and remain on the outside of the carbon block. Therefore, because of the density and lack of oxygen and space inside the block, bacteria cannot breed in the medium and come out in the finished water.

Convenient: This type of system provides purified water on demand so there is no storage, nor running out at inconvenient times, no ordering bottles or picking bottles up from the store.

Inexpensive: This type of filter is a replaceable, self-clogging cartridge that lasts eight to 12 months (dependent on amount of sediment and dirt). The cartridge is designed to be replaced in minutes at home by the homeowner, just like screwing in a new light bulb. The cost of the units are relatively inexpensive -- over a ten-year period, the cost of the unit plus maintenance works out to a mere sixty bucks a year!! The cost of the water itself is from four to 8 cents per gallon. The units themselves are generally very easy to install and are designed to be a 45 minute installation for the handy homeowner or plumber. They can also be connected with refrigerators that have automatic icemakers and water dispensers so that all the water that a household consumes is purified!
The only drawback to solid carbon block systems is they will not remove nitrates or sulfides (byproducts of agricultural fertilization), and in these cases RO technology can take care of the problem. Nitrates and sulfides are found in relatively few areas however, so most consumers do not need to worry about them.


Salute!

__________________
On Tap #1 - East End Brew
On Tap #2 - Nada
On Tap #3 - Nuttin-Honey Ale
Fermenting - BMB's Cascading Citra Ale
bmckee56 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2010, 07:38 AM   #7
Catt22
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4,998
Liked 57 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmckee56 View Post
Solid Carbon Block Filters

This technology has combined the incredible adsorption capability of carbon discussed previously with the ability of a solid brick of material to selectively strain out particles from water forced through it. The density of the brick determines how finely the water is cleaned. The better brands of this type of filter have a three part filter and are designed to prevent any possibility of "bypass" due to high pressure failure.
The following list of features are what combine to create the type of filter that will remove the widest range of possible contaminants in the drinking water:


Mechanical straining: the block of carbon mechanically strains out dirt, sediment, rust, algae, bacteria, microscopic worms, cryptosporidia and asbestos. This is all accomplished by water pressure so no electricity is required -- such a filter even works on a simple hand pump in emergencies!

Chemical bonding: As explained earlier, activated carbon bonds to thousands of chemicals. In fact, carbon will bond to most chemicals known to man! When water is forced through the solid carbon block, it is forced to slow down and increase the contact time with the carbon, allowing the carbon bonding to take place to remove the chemical pollutants like toxics, pesticides, THM's, chlorine, bad tastes, odors, etc.
Health-providing trace minerals like dissolved calcium and magnesium do not bond to carbon and are allowed to pass through, thereby retaining the health quality and good taste of the water.

Heavy metals like lead do not bond to the carbon, but are strained out by the pore size of the block -- basically like trying to fit a basketball down a hole designed for a ping pong ball!!


Prevention of bacterial growth: Bacteria are strained out and remain on the outside of the carbon block. Therefore, because of the density and lack of oxygen and space inside the block, bacteria cannot breed in the medium and come out in the finished water.

Convenient: This type of system provides purified water on demand so there is no storage, nor running out at inconvenient times, no ordering bottles or picking bottles up from the store.

Inexpensive: This type of filter is a replaceable, self-clogging cartridge that lasts eight to 12 months (dependent on amount of sediment and dirt). The cartridge is designed to be replaced in minutes at home by the homeowner, just like screwing in a new light bulb. The cost of the units are relatively inexpensive -- over a ten-year period, the cost of the unit plus maintenance works out to a mere sixty bucks a year!! The cost of the water itself is from four to 8 cents per gallon. The units themselves are generally very easy to install and are designed to be a 45 minute installation for the handy homeowner or plumber. They can also be connected with refrigerators that have automatic icemakers and water dispensers so that all the water that a household consumes is purified!
The only drawback to solid carbon block systems is they will not remove nitrates or sulfides (byproducts of agricultural fertilization), and in these cases RO technology can take care of the problem. Nitrates and sulfides are found in relatively few areas however, so most consumers do not need to worry about them.
This info appears to be from this site: http://pwn.com/guide.html#carbon%20block

While most of the information seems to be fairly accurate, I think some of it is nothing more than marketing B.S. as they are selling filters and filter systems. Not exactly an unbiased source IMO. OTOH, I use an extruded solid carbon block water filter and I'm very satisfied with it's performance, although I have no way of actually testing the filtered water myself, so this is nothing more than a purely subjective evaluation on my part. I have read that carbon filters won't remove chloramines, dissolved minerals, salts and more than a few other substances. The smaller under the counter type units that many of us use require a relatively slow flow rate in order to do a good job of filtering out the undesirables. This isn't usually a problem for us home brewers. I usually only filter at about 1 gpm or so. Using one of these relatively small filters for whole house water filtration would be a different thing entirely. You'd need a fairly hefty unit to provide a decent flow rate with adequate filtration.
__________________
Catt22 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2010, 04:02 AM   #8
WPStrassburg
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 515
Liked 25 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

If you have an ro membrane do not dry it out. They have to stay moist. Why bother pulling the filters apart anyways? If the housings are full of water and valved off you aren't going to get any contamination. Exposed filters risk mold and damage if they aren't in the housing.

__________________
WPStrassburg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2010, 04:28 AM   #9
Soperbrew
Who rated my beer?
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Soperbrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,625
Liked 67 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

This is a good question. I've always dried mine out, but was never sure if it was necessary or not. Would leaving it submerged in water do anything to it's life span? Or drying it for that matter?

__________________
NHC 2012 pics

NHC 2011 pics

NHC 2010 pics
Soperbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2010, 06:50 AM   #10
Catt22
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4,998
Liked 57 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WPStrassburg View Post
Why bother pulling the filters apart anyways? If the housings are full of water and valved off you aren't going to get any contamination. Exposed filters risk mold and damage if they aren't in the housing.
I disagree on this. I once unintentionally left the filter in the housing for several weeks between brew sessions. Before using it again, I opened it up and found that what appeared to be mold or possibly algae of some kind accumulated on the outer polyester layer of my carbon block cartridge. So, it has been my experience that, indeed, stuff can and probably will grow in the stagnant water. Probably not a big deal, but the filter housing is far from a sterile environment. I'm more careful to remember to remove the cartridge between uses now in light of that discovery. I now routinely rinse and air dry the housing, cartridge and gaskets as a precaution.
__________________
Catt22 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water filters ebaynote Equipment/Sanitation 1 07-17-2010 11:35 PM
Anyone Use Really Big water filters? virus692 Equipment/Sanitation 12 03-27-2009 03:51 PM
Where can you buy white potable water hoses for filters? Stevorino Equipment/Sanitation 11 07-02-2008 03:39 PM
Let's talk water filters Cheesefood Equipment/Sanitation 19 04-26-2007 09:07 PM
Water Filters DesertBrew Equipment/Sanitation 24 04-02-2007 03:47 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS