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Old 01-18-2007, 06:40 PM   #1
xpoc454
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Default stainleees steel/aluminum identification?

I got a used 5 gallon pot and thought it was stainlees steel, but now Im not sure.
Id there a sure fired test to tell the difference between a stainlees steel pot and aluminum pots?
The outside of the pot is shiny but the inside has has lateral grooves in it.

All it has on the pot is the stamping No. 824 Nation sanitation Foundation. Bloomfield Indiana.
I know neither alum or stainlees will have a magnet stick to it.

Thanks for any help.
jim

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Old 01-18-2007, 06:42 PM   #2
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Brew in it for 20 years and see if you get alziemers

Sorry.

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Old 01-18-2007, 06:45 PM   #3
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Actually I just checked it with a strong magnet and it does stick to the pot.
I assume that means it cant be aluminum.
But I also thought SS would not stick a magnet either. I guess I was wrong?
There isnt any wierd aluminum coated steel pots are there?
This one is pretty thick, maybe 1/8th inch thick metal. Thats why I like it.
Much better than my Kmart 1/62 inch pot I got for like 20 $.

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Old 01-18-2007, 06:47 PM   #4
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There's different grades of SS the lower grades are magnetic. So It'll be SS.

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Old 01-18-2007, 07:05 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orfy
Brew in it for 20 years and see if you get alziemers

Sorry.

haha...nice
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Old 01-18-2007, 07:19 PM   #6
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There are several families of stainless steel: FERRITIC, MARTENSITIC, AUSTENITIC and DUPLEX. These names are derived from the crystal structure of the steels, which governs their metallurgical behavior.

FERRITIC stainless steels are magnetic, have a low carbon content and contain chromium as the main alloying element, typically between 13% and 17%.They are not hardenable by heat treatment.

MARTENSITIC stainless steels are magnetic, containing typically 12% chromium with a higher carbon content than the ferritic types. They are hardenable by quenching and tempering like plain carbon steels and find their main application in cutlery, aerospace and general engineering.

AUSTENITIC stainless steels are non-magnetic and, in addition to chromium typically around 18%, contain nickel. This enhances their corrosion resistance and modifies the structure from ferritic to austenitic. They are the most widely used group of stainless steels. They are not hardenable by heat treatment.

DUPLEX stainless steels are used where combinations of higher strength and corrosion resistance are needed. They have a mixed structure of austenite and ferrite, hence the term "duplex". They are not hardenable by heat treatment.

Even though wrought, austenitic stainless steels, such as 304 and 316, are generally regarded as non-magnetic in the annealed condition, if they are cold worked they will be attracted to a permanent magnet. You may find that the magnetic permeability is very weak along the broad side of the kettle, but it will be much stronger where ever the stainless has been bent in a press, like along the rolled edge at the top or along the bend at the bottom.

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Old 01-19-2007, 01:29 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsma22
There are several families of stainless steel: FERRITIC, MARTENSITIC, AUSTENITIC and DUPLEX. These names are derived from the crystal structure of the steels, which governs their metallurgical behavior.

FERRITIC stainless steels are magnetic, have a low carbon content and contain chromium as the main alloying element, typically between 13% and 17%.They are not hardenable by heat treatment.

MARTENSITIC stainless steels are magnetic, containing typically 12% chromium with a higher carbon content than the ferritic types. They are hardenable by quenching and tempering like plain carbon steels and find their main application in cutlery, aerospace and general engineering.

AUSTENITIC stainless steels are non-magnetic and, in addition to chromium typically around 18%, contain nickel. This enhances their corrosion resistance and modifies the structure from ferritic to austenitic. They are the most widely used group of stainless steels. They are not hardenable by heat treatment.

DUPLEX stainless steels are used where combinations of higher strength and corrosion resistance are needed. They have a mixed structure of austenite and ferrite, hence the term "duplex". They are not hardenable by heat treatment.

Even though wrought, austenitic stainless steels, such as 304 and 316, are generally regarded as non-magnetic in the annealed condition, if they are cold worked they will be attracted to a permanent magnet. You may find that the magnetic permeability is very weak along the broad side of the kettle, but it will be much stronger where ever the stainless has been bent in a press, like along the rolled edge at the top or along the bend at the bottom.

John
This pot I have is definatetly magnetic. Its inside is nto a smooth surface but a finely grooved surface. The outside is smooth and shiny.
The inside has kinda of a silver to grey color the outside is the shiny SS color to it. This is a used pot.
So Im guessing its one of the first two. Are these two any good for brewing? I dont want to have any wierdo tastes in my beer.

thanks
jim
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Old 01-19-2007, 01:35 AM   #8
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No chance of finding out from the previous owner, huh?

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Old 01-19-2007, 01:42 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trinitone
No chance of finding out from the previous owner, huh?
Its from my work and i think its pretty old. No one remembers where it came from.
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Old 01-19-2007, 05:44 AM   #10
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As long as it is clean, use it. It will be fine. I would go out and get some Bar Keepers Friend and give it a good scrub with some fine scrubby pads. The oxalic acid will help to build back up the oxide layer on the stainless steel and it will really make it look great!

John

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