Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Speidel Braumeister (brewmaster)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-22-2013, 06:16 PM   #2161
Soviet
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 175
Liked 22 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brautim View Post
So reading through your process it looks like everything you are doing is correct to remove haze, however you did mention that when filtering one of your beers that it came out cloudier.

Now...I know nothing about filtering, but I do know that fining and temperature play a large role in the removal of chill haze. So as an experiment maybe you could fine & chill a future beer then split it, filter one batch and leave the other batch in the fridge at near 32f and see what happens after a couple of days?

Nothing in your process appears to point to the BM being the cause though.
Unless I'm not mashing long enough and my starch isn't converting all the way...
__________________
Soviet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-22-2013, 07:48 PM   #2162
brautim
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: UK
Posts: 14
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soviet View Post
Unless I'm not mashing long enough and my starch isn't converting all the way...
So next questions would be:

What brewing software do you use?
What malts are you brewing with?
What is your mash schedule?
How long is the boil?
Do you get hot & cold breaks?
Can you see cold break in the kettle when drained?
Is your Whirlfloc in date?
__________________
brautim is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2013, 01:03 PM   #2163
dinnerstick
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 1,938
Liked 223 Times on 168 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdebonth View Post
Also the boil temp does not get above 98c on my machine, even with 20L of wort on the 50L BM with dual heaters. I haven't looked up the physics but I think this is pretty much as hot as water can get before it changes state.
depends mostly on ambient pressure, which in turn depends mostly on elevation (also influenced by solutes). here at sea level mine gets to 100
__________________
dinnerstick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2013, 12:42 PM   #2164
lylo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lacombe, Alberta
Posts: 199
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I boil at around 97C at 850 meters.

__________________
lylo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2013, 05:25 PM   #2165
pjk49202
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
pjk49202's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Parker, CO, Colorado
Posts: 232
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

My boil doesn't go past 94 and I'm at 5,800 ft.

__________________
pjk49202 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-28-2013, 09:37 PM   #2166
jstafftx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Pinehurst, North Carolina
Posts: 7
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jstafftx View Post
Yesterday I attempted my first batch with a new 20l Braumeister and it was the longest brew day that I have ever endured. I started heating my water at 4pm and did not finish the boil until 1:30 am. I have looked through the forum several times and have never seen anyone discuss the issues I encountered.

1. It took almost two hours for the system to heat my strike water to 66 celsius. Is that normal? I filled the Braumeister with warm water from the tap and my house temperature was 72 Fahrenheit.

After I doughed in the Braumeister executed the two mash programs without any observable issues. I drained the grains without sparging and then had to wait oven 90 min for the system to start the boil.

2. The system never reached the programmed 102 celsius for the boil. The hottest temp reached was 98 celsius. I did not use the copper dome or insulating jacket. I had programmed a 90 min boil but it took much longer than that (over 2 hours). I don't have exact times and data because I was several drinks into the brew day/night, but my experience with the Braumeister doesn't seem right.

Is my new system a lemon?
The electrician installed a 20 amp 240v circuit breaker and outlet over the weekend. The BM worked as promised. It was awesome! I can't wait to brew my next batch.
__________________
jstafftx is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-29-2013, 04:41 PM   #2167
Mateus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Posts: 5
Default

If someone could please help me out. Im going to buy a BM clone. I live in Brazil and the manufacture company offers to do a personalized tube to use on the 50L model.

I've been reading this thread and saw the efforts to do high gravity batches. Specially Batfink´s attempts by drilling holes in the tube.

My question would be: what is the most optimized size of a tube (to use on the 50L model) so as to get the higher possible OG?

I ask because it seams its a ratio of grain storage capacity vs. water need to recirculate. Has anyone figured this out?

Tks a lot!

__________________
Mateus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-30-2013, 10:54 AM   #2168
jdebonth
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 33
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mateus View Post
If someone could please help me out. Im going to buy a BM clone. I live in Brazil and the manufacture company offers to do a personalized tube to use on the 50L model.
I've been reading this thread and saw the efforts to do high gravity batches. Specially Batfink´s attempts by drilling holes in the tube.
My question would be: what is the most optimized size of a tube (to use on the 50L model) so as to get the higher possible OG?
I ask because it seams its a ratio of grain storage capacity vs. water need to recirculate. Has anyone figured this out?
Tks a lot!
Since I have put a bit of thought into this myself I’ll give you my personal take:

To answer your question, the most optimised size of the tube in order to maximise OG is to make it as large as possible. Reason is that this maximises the ratio of water in direct contact with the grist vs. the total water in the system (however this doesnt improve the OG limitations by very much). The reason why some have suggested using a length in between the short and long pipes is so that you are able to brew a larger volume of wort and then boil this down (to increase the OG) and still have a good (~20L) batch size left over. With the 20L pipe there is just not much wort left. It’s important to note that the BM is limited in post mashing/pre-boil OG… high post-boil OG beers can be easily brewed by increasing the boil length until you hit whatever OG target you are after, no limitation whatsoever here (I did a 155min boil recently to bring a high gravity IIPA from 1.047 post mash OG to 1.083 post boil OG).

The reason why the BM design is limited in terms of post mash/pre-boil OG is because of the large amount of water in the system which is not in direct contact with the grist. In traditional brewing systems there is only the false bottom which can be designed to take up almost negligible space, and then the piping that circulates the wort through the heating elements and back to the top of the grain bed which is also negligible in volume. So almost 100% of the water is in contact. With the BM system there are two areas that take up a significant amount of space; the bottom section of the malt pipe (underneath the mesh), and the space outside of the malt pipe that needs to be filled with water to a certain level to ensure the heating elements are covered and don’t overheat.

These two areas need to be addressed to really make a difference. Since you are doing a DIY BM you could think about doing the following:
- Put the outer heating elements on the inside space within the malt pipe area, you will need less water volume outside of the malt pipe, just enough to ensure the pump does not run dry.
- Reduce the height of the space underneath the lower mesh in the malt pipe. The challenge here is to ensure the water continues to flow uniformly upwards throughout the grain bed, so you might want to add diverters on the pump outlets to ensure this (this is a mod I am planning to try on my BM50L). Alternatively you could just untighten and rotate the malt pipe several times during the mash to ensure uniform flow.

Another more extreme option is to redesign the way the water flows in the system. You could move back to the traditional way of pumping water from the bottom of the kettle, running it up with a pipe and sprinkling it over the grain bed. If you put the heating elements only in the space within the malt pipe underneath the grain bed then you wouldn’t need to utilise the space around the malt pipe at all (bottom of malt pipe would need to be sealed off which should not be a problem). This would be like a typical brewing system however with the amazing benefit the BM has where you can just lift out the grains and boil away in the same kettle. This is how I personally would have designed the system, and might be something I plan to do in the future if I get more free time on my hands.
__________________
jdebonth is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-30-2013, 02:12 PM   #2169
Mateus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Posts: 5
Default

Tks jdebonth!

I was afraid someone would say that. I was having trouble figuring out why Batfink had success with the drilled tube (isn't that just a 30 litre tube? )
As you said, that gives more room for boiling and still having a decent size batch. But i worry a bit about these very long boils, someone have pointed out that caramelization occurs, and more undesired reactions could be going on.

One other concern i have is oxygenation of the worth. With the small beer´s its not such a problem since the flow is slow and smooth, and the drop is not very high. That problem would increase when setting up a high gravity version, as you pointed the drop would be much higher and i think the risk of oxygenating the worth then could become a real problem.

My setup is not a DIY, but the manufacture is very flexible on making personalizations. I´m going to bottom drain by putting a tee and two valves on the pump. That way i wont need the main valve on the front at all. I´ll have to use a hop bag or figure out a way do do a stopper though.

__________________
Mateus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2013, 02:06 PM   #2170
topoisomerase
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
topoisomerase's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2
Default

hi everyone!

what better inaugural post (i am new here) than one about my first batch brewed with my new Braumeister 20L? first of all, i can't thank this board and others enough for all of the valuable feedback. it made doing my purchase research so much easier! i'm also happy to say that dealing with Thorsten was as effortless and effective as i was lead to believe by this group. my system was also delivered faster than expected!

OK so yesterday i made the original Blind Pig IPA recipe which Vinnie has shared. i'd like to say everything went off flawlessly, and largely it did - with one major exception. i don't have a 220V outlet in my rented house, so i purchased a beefy stepdown transformer from Amazon. i'm pretty sure P=I*V is working against me here as either the wattage is wholly insufficient for efficient heating, or something is wrong with my unit. it took a good 2+ hours to get from 22C-52C, and all other transitions in my mash schedule were incredibly long. my boil timer started at 95C as designed by Speidel, but when i opened the lid for the boil and came back 30 minutes later, i'd lost 5C. in the end i pulled it all together and got the batch in the fermenter. let's just say my brew day was about 14 hours long (!)

does this match anyone else's experience with trying to run on 110V? it seems a non-starter for me if so, therefore i'll have our electrician in next week to remedy things if i'm right. any feedback at all would be greatly appreciated!

otherwise, i was really happy with how the unit worked. having done a lot of reading and watching of YouTube videos (thanks, guys!) i felt really informed and it made the day go a lot better than it would have otherwise, given the time hassles i encountered.

thanks very much!
-jason

__________________
topoisomerase is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I met the Boulevard's Brewmaster Friday DannPM General Beer Discussion 1 02-02-2011 04:56 AM
braumeister noobster101 General Beer Discussion 22 06-03-2010 03:50 PM
#1 cool job: brewmaster Spunkmeyer General Beer Discussion 9 06-03-2008 03:50 AM
how to contact sierra nevada brewmaster grrtt78 General Beer Discussion 8 02-07-2007 05:19 PM