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Old 05-02-2013, 07:52 PM   #2051
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Originally Posted by ruskii View Post

Also, what is the water to grain ratio on these units?
you can't change the volume of water very much, you need a minimum amount for it to circulate. i typically start with 22-23 liters. a normal mash is 4-6 kg grain but you can go higher.
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Old 05-02-2013, 09:46 PM   #2052
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I am curious about getting BM but I had couple of questions if somebody can help me out.

So mashing design in this machine is fundamentally different from traditional "coolers/mash tuns". My concern is how does constant flow of liquid through grains affect the taste? I mean is it better to let grains mash quietly with occasional stir or it would not make a difference to let liquid flow through grains during the whole mashing process?

Also, what is the water to grain ratio on these units?

Greatly appreciated.
The flow through the grain bed in a Braumeister isn't all that different from the flow that would occur in a HERMS or RIMS type system. The only difference is the direction of the flow, i.e. bottom to top vs. top to bottom.

Since you don't sparge, at least by default, you do need to start with a lot more water than you'd have in a traditional cooler type setup. Thin vs. thick mass and its impacts or effeminacy, enzymatic reactions and flavor have been debated on these forums many time before.

While YMMV, the beer I'm producing is pretty damn tasty.
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Old 05-02-2013, 09:58 PM   #2053
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Originally Posted by rnarzisi View Post
The flow through the grain bed in a Braumeister isn't all that different from the flow that would occur in a HERMS or RIMS type system. The only difference is the direction of the flow, i.e. bottom to top vs. top to bottom.

Since you don't sparge, at least by default, you do need to start with a lot more water than you'd have in a traditional cooler type setup. Thin vs. thick mass and its impacts or effeminacy, enzymatic reactions and flavor have been debated on these forums many time before.

While YMMV, the beer I'm producing is pretty damn tasty.
In regular cooler set up we dont circulate water nonstop only when we sparge.
Here it gets circulated non stop and at pretty good flow rate.
Just curious if that can decrease the efficiency and/or introduce off flavors.

I guess Germans do know what they are doing
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:54 PM   #2054
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The european 220 wire is quite small in diameter and the US 220 plug is made to accept a much larger gauge wire.
So I figured I would need to beef up the euro wire so the US plug could be attached and secured safely.

First I cut the European plug off in a way to use the portion next to the plug
so it could be used to make the euro wire thick enough
to be secured buy the larger 220 plug wire support.Attachment 37487

Next I threaded the euro wire through a section of 10 gauge sleeve that I had removed to expose
the wires for the 10 gauge wire extencion cord that I needed to make.Attachment 37488

I drilled out the part cut from the euro plug to be able to go over the sleeve from the 220 euro wire.
The inside had been molded to accept just the wires and was not large enough in diameter to go over the 220 euro wire sleeve.

I Threaded on the part cut from the euro plug (small end first) over the wires and sleeve
to make the portion close to the 220 plug big enough to be captured by the 220 wire keeper.
(green plastic part in the US 220 plug)Attachment 37489

I then wired the 220 plug with the green and yellow wire connected to the negative
as suggested in an earlier post.Attachment 37490

Then connect the other two wires to their respective parts of the plug and tested with a volt meter… Before plugging into the Braumeister.
Proud new member of the club, my BM20 just arrived yesterday!!!

Just now working on my plug and this post in particular was really helpful. I've got the same leviton 14-30P plug and although I'm certainly no electrician, isn't the green/yellow wire on the wrong prong? Redstag says he hooked it up to the "negative," which I assume he meant "neutral." Shouldn't it be on Ground?

From what I've read, again, I'm no electrician so correct me if I'm wrong:
In the old three-prong dryer plugs there were two hots and a neutral/ground (neutral/ground was the L-shaped prong). However, in the newer four prong plugs, which are now code, the neutral and ground were divided into two separate prongs: The round prong with the green screw is ground (to the right in his picture), and the L-shaped prong is neutral (to the left in his picture). The neutral prong isn't required since the BM doesn't need 120V. The BM's yellow/green wire is ground, not neutral, so it goes to the round prong with the green screw (ground). The BM's hot and neutral wires (brown and blue) then go to the plug's two hot prongs. Since the plug and receptacle's neutral isn't required, I'm not even going to insert the L-shaped prong into the case (the Leviton plug's prongs are are removable).

Does this sound about right? Hurry if I'm wrong, I'm wiring mine up this afternoon.

Cheers,
Todd
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:58 PM   #2055
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This is the pic I was referencing:

016.jpg  
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:35 AM   #2056
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Did an 80L batch today in the 50L Braumeister. 25 lb grain then water+DME/sugar to proper OG. 1.06

Stoked that plate chiller, pump and CIP were all delivered in time and a success.

bb20g2.jpg   bb20g.jpg  
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:11 PM   #2057
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Default Higher grain bill with Braumeister

This may have already have been covered, but I haven't found it with a quick search.

I'm thinking of brewing a Pliny the Elder clone. It needs about 14 lb. of grain. How about if I put 3 lb. in a bag, have the Braumeister heat a few liters of water to, say, 152 degees F in manual mode, put in the malt pipe and bottom screen with the pump turned off, and mash the 3 lb. for an hour ala BIAB. Then I would drain the bag for 15 minutes.

At that point I would add water to the drained wort to bring the volume to 23 liters, and go to automatic to mash the remaining 11lb. I would end up with 20 liters without putting in too much grain at any time.

Seems like it would work to me. Any problems that you can see?

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Old 05-05-2013, 04:07 PM   #2058
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Default Question about GFCI with 240v from a 14-30 dryer plug

Question about GFCI with 240v from a 14-30R:

Again, I'm no electrician, so I reserve the right to be wrong about any and all of this...

I've searched the forum and read a few things about GFCI with the BM, but nothing definitive, so I'll ask. I've also posted this to a few other electric brewing forums where people are using 240v.

In a US household 240v setup where you're using two out of phase hots to make 240, the neutral isn't being used. I thought GFCIs measure the difference between hot and neutral and trip if it exceeds parameters (the outgoing path exceeds the return path by certain limits). Neutral isn't being used in our setups though, each out of phase hot acts as the others neutral/return path. If the dedicated neutral isn't used, only the two hots and ground, will the GFCI still work? I'm not certain how a GFCI is wired internally - hopefully they also monitor the difference between out of phase hots. Somebody is using and posted a picture of a European GFCI receptacle and I wonder if it's actually working correctly. It's monitoring the return path, which in Europe is a dedicated neutral, but in the US is an out of phase hot. Hopefully it can handle the difference. Hopefully, these little GFCIs are smarter than me and can handle all of these iterations and trip appropriately.

[Note added for the forums where people are using the 120v and the 240v from the dryer plug, like http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/]
My electric brewery setup is a little different, I don't use 120v in mine. I'm still using a 14-30P four-prong dryer plug, but I'm only tapping the two hots and the ground, and then distributing it through a three-prong NEMA 6-20R. My brewery plugs in with a 6-20P, pulling 240v and ground. It's a Speidel Braumeister designed for European 230v and many people have simply put a four-prong 14-30P dryer plug on it, skipping the plug's neutral and wiring the European hot and neutral to the two hots on the dryer plug. Ground is still used. Nobody has any issues with it, but I'd like to add the safety of GFCI if possible.

Cheers,
Todd

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Old 05-05-2013, 07:37 PM   #2059
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For those who have received their systems recently, what was the led time on getting your BM?

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Old 05-05-2013, 11:14 PM   #2060
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For those who have received their systems recently, what was the led time on getting your BM?
I had mine delivered within a week from Canadian Homebrew Supplies. They carry stock as far as I know, but they're a little more expensive than the US distributors.
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