The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Speidel Braumeister (brewmaster)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-05-2012, 09:26 PM   #1831
Alchemy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: vernon, ct
Posts: 353
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psehorne View Post
Your actual electricity voltage is probably somewhere between 220v and 250v. It should be the same as all other residential 240v systems in the U.S. The 250V on the receptacle is just its rating. It is not the voltage of your electricity. If you measure the voltage across the two hots of the receptacle you will see your actual voltage (under no load. - It might drop a bit under load). If measure from the ground of the receptacle to either hot you should see 1/2 of the voltage; i.e. ~120v.

Running your Braumeister on this will not damage it because of the type of plug (assuming everything is wired correctly). And as long as the voltage does not exceed the Braumeister voltage rating, everything should work just fine. In fact, you should be better off without the converter.

The Braumeister manual shows '230 V ~'. That means 'approx. 230 V'. I believe U.S. electricity is more properly called 240v (and 120v), but you will hear it referred to as 220, 230, 240, etc. Spiedel says that the Braumeister is designed to run properly with U.S. electricity.


Thank you for putting my mind at ease. Now maybe i can get these guys to make me a cable http://www.elecordset.com/moreinfo.a...Duty.aspx&ai=M

From what i read the Braumeister uses a c13 end, so a nema 10-30p with a c13 female should do the trick.

Then on to installing a vent hood and i can be brewing nearly every day while i do my day job!
__________________
Future Brews Graff! - is it beer? is it cider?! is it GOOD?! we will see.
Primary Cherry Apple Wine, White Grape Peach Mango Mead (the mead baby)
Secondary Bog Monster Cranberry Grape Melomel the 2nd
Bottled Bog Monster Cranberry Grape Melomel, Grape Burn and Pillage Pyment
Kegged A Dark Ale w/No Name, Tosh's Cinnamon Challenge Cider, Carabou Slobber
Alchemy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-05-2012, 09:45 PM   #1832
dinnerstick
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 1,904
Liked 212 Times on 161 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagelfarsan View Post
Hello everyone!

After that I tossed in a hop bag filled with about 0,5kg of uncrushed pilsner malt and put the braumeister in manual mode set at 43 c with the pump off.
interesting, i was wondering where i was going to do my first sour mash (wort). might have to try that. but in the summer! light lemony beer in a blizzard?? a snowblower beer? crazy swedes!
hope it turns out great, cheers for the idea
__________________
dinnerstick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-05-2012, 10:08 PM   #1833
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemy View Post

From what i read the Braumeister uses a c13 end
C13 is correct for a 20L. A previous post stated that 50L takes a C19.
__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2012, 03:38 PM   #1834
dinnerstick
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 1,904
Liked 212 Times on 161 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Obliviousbrew View Post
I´m planning a big barley wine for the 21st of December and was thinking about 1968 but was afraid that it may end up too sweet. please, let me know how it goes and how much attenuattes looks promising
after another week it's 1.031, i'm calling that final.
__________________
dinnerstick is offline
Obliviousbrew Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2012, 03:41 PM   #1835
Obliviousbrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Benidorm, Alicante/Spain
Posts: 1,571
Liked 225 Times on 157 Posts
Likes Given: 168

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dinnerstick View Post
after another week it's 1.031, i'm calling that final.
thank you for the reply 69% doesn´t look bad for a beer that big and with that yeast! I may finally go for it.
__________________
Obliviousbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2012, 04:51 PM   #1836
Gear101
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
 
Gear101's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 2,084
Liked 70 Times on 65 Posts
Likes Given: 187

Default

I see they are now making a 500l unit. That would work good for a small brew pub, no price on the unit post yet,so that would be approx 8 kegs. They also have now posted new 550l ferms, with 5-7 of those, I think that would be a nice cheap way into a brew pub.

__________________
Island Time Brewery
Kegs:
Black Caesar Imperial Stout by Island Time Brewery
Islamorada Pale Ale by Island Time Brewery

Stainless is Painless
Gear101 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-09-2012, 07:49 PM   #1837
bierdude
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 22
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Another alternative to the dryer plug end. First, to add to the post by psehorne - voltage ratings are "nominal" numbers and not the actual measured voltage. You have to use a volt meter to measure the actual Line-to-Line (black wire to black wire) voltage at your panel. Typical US line-to-neutral (black wire to white wire) voltages can be anywhere from 110V to 120V (220V to 240V Line-to-Line). The Line-to-Line voltage on a single phase residential system is double the Line-to-neutral voltage. The Speidel is rated at 230V and as psehorne said is rated to work on the US (220V-240V) line-to-line system. The difference between the US and Euro systems is that Europe is 50Hz and US is 60Hz. This only really matters for motors and analog clocks, etc as they will not operate correctly. But, no issue with the Braumeister as it mainly a resistive heater, the computer power supply converts the voltage run the computer, and the pump(s) are rated 200-240V 50/60Hz (I is an electric utility engineer...).
If you want to use the Speidel plug as-is International Configurations Inc sells a European receptacle that fits in a standard US single-gang box.
The receptacle is part # - 70100X45
Adapter frame is part # - 79120X45-N
White cover plate part# - 79130X45-N
about $30 total.
They also sell a GFCI version which was discussed in Post #636.

__________________
bierdude is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-11-2012, 06:02 PM   #1838
Redstag
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Redstag's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 55
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I have the 50L Braumeister
Fill to the prescribed mark.
Sparge to replace the water absorbed by the grain.
Boil as stated for the recipe. 60 or 90 min
Adding hops (pellet) directly to kettle.
And end up with much less than 5 g. in each carboy due to trub.
Finishing with about 4 1/4 g. or less in each Keg.

I know some people use sacks/screens to keep the loss of wart to a
minimum.
And some just add there hops to the kettle not worrying about the loss.
As stated by some whirpooling is difficult at best, and letting the hop gunk settle out before transferring to carboy helps.
I know it is expected to lose a bit of wart when racking but ....not happy

Are there any Braumeister's ending up with 5gallons of finished beer in there kegs?
If so, where am I going wrong?
What is the average amount of finished beer you guys and gals are getting out of your systems?

I wish Ya'll a safe and happy holliday season.

__________________
Redstag is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-11-2012, 06:39 PM   #1839
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Redstag View Post
I have the 50L Braumeister
Fill to the prescribed mark.
Sparge to replace the water absorbed by the grain.
Boil as stated for the recipe. 60 or 90 min
Adding hops (pellet) directly to kettle.
And end up with much less than 5 g. in each carboy due to trub.
Finishing with about 4 1/4 g. or less in each Keg.

I know some people use sacks/screens to keep the loss of wart to a
minimum.
And some just add there hops to the kettle not worrying about the loss.
As stated by some whirpooling is difficult at best, and letting the hop gunk settle out before transferring to carboy helps.
I know it is expected to lose a bit of wart when racking but ....not happy

Are there any Braumeister's ending up with 5gallons of finished beer in there kegs?
If so, where am I going wrong?
What is the average amount of finished beer you guys and gals are getting out of your systems?

I wish Ya'll a safe and happy holliday season.
I have a 20L not a 50L, but perhaps the following will still be useful to you.

I fill wort up to the neck of my 5 gal carboy. That means about 20L (5 gal + 1L up to the neck.). In doing so I have had wort left that would not fit into the carboy that I threw away or used later for a starter. When filling the carboy to the neck it is necessary to use a blow-off hose, in which case there will be a more than a liter of loss into the blow-off reservoir, leaving a little less than 5 gal in the carboy. Additional loss will occur when racking from the carboy. Total loss in fermenting and racking about 2.4 liter. So starting with 19.5L in the carboy (the most it will hold) I end up with about 17.1 into my keg. I would need to use a larger carboy to do better.

I use BeerSmith and set the batch size to the amount I want to go into the carboy (19.5L) and set the trub loss in the kettle of .6L (best I can do by tilting the kettle when moving wort to the carboy) and adjust the ingredients to get the OG, SRM, and IBU I want.

EDIT: In addition to setting the kettle trub loss to .6L I also set the fermentation loss to 2.4L.


To leave the least amount of trub in the kettle I use one of the malt pipe fine screens in front of the kettle outlet (inside the kettle) to get as much wort out as possible and leave the trub in the kettle. The screen will get clogged quickly; so I rotate the screen to a new spot several times throughout the process to draining the wort from the kettle into the carboy.

I haven't tried it but I think I could get more more out of my 20L. Using BeerSmith it would just be a matter of increasing the batch size and the ingredients appropriately to maintain targets. At some point the amount of ingredients that would be required could exceed the Braumeister capability. How soon this occurs would depend on the OG you are shooting for. So far (5 batches) I have not brewed anything with an OG higher than 1.055; so I think I could increase the batch size (and carboy size) so as to end up with a full 5 gal in my keg. I have thought about doing this, but just have no sprung for another carboy.

Hope there is something here that helps you.
__________________

Last edited by psehorne; 12-11-2012 at 06:44 PM. Reason: grammar correction and additional info
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-11-2012, 06:58 PM   #1840
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psehorne View Post
I have a 20L not a 50L, but perhaps the following will still be useful to you.

I fill wort up to the neck of my 5 gal carboy. That means about 20L (5 gal + 1L up to the neck.). In doing so I have had wort left that would not fit into the carboy that I threw away or used later for a starter. When filling the carboy to the neck it is necessary to use a blow-off hose, in which case there will be a more than a liter of loss into the blow-off reservoir, leaving a little less than 5 gal in the carboy. Additional loss will occur when racking from the carboy. Total loss in fermenting and racking about 2.4 liter. So starting with 19.5L in the carboy (the most it will hold) I end up with about 17.1 into my keg. I would need to use a larger carboy to do better.

I use BeerSmith and set the batch size to the amount I want to go into the carboy (19.5L) and set the trub loss in the kettle of .6L (best I can do by tilting the kettle when moving wort to the carboy) and adjust the ingredients to get the OG, SRM, and IBU I want.

EDIT: In addition to setting the kettle trub loss to .6L I also set the fermentation loss to 2.4L.


To leave the least amount of trub in the kettle I use one of the malt pipe fine screens in front of the kettle outlet (inside the kettle) to get as much wort out as possible and leave the trub in the kettle. The screen will get clogged quickly; so I rotate the screen to a new spot several times throughout the process to draining the wort from the kettle into the carboy.

I haven't tried it but I think I could get more more out of my 20L. Using BeerSmith it would just be a matter of increasing the batch size and the ingredients appropriately to maintain targets. At some point the amount of ingredients that would be required could exceed the Braumeister capability. How soon this occurs would depend on the OG you are shooting for. So far (5 batches) I have not brewed anything with an OG higher than 1.055; so I think I could increase the batch size (and carboy size) so as to end up with a full 5 gal in my keg. I have thought about doing this, but just have no sprung for another carboy.

Hope there is something here that helps you.
One more variable. In addition to the batch size you get out of the kettle, if you are using a pre-made starter, you will have that much more to go into the carboy. You can account for that in BeerSmith also.

I've not been using a pre-made starter (that's another topic for later). So my batch size does not include the benefit of adding a starter to the wort coming out of the Braumeister. If I were to use a pre-made starter and leave the batch size the same in BeerSmith and tell BeerSmith to add the starter to the wort going into the carboy fermentor I could brew that same batch size but have 22.5 L go into a (larger) carboy - 19.5 brewed batch plus 3L starter. With 2.4L fermentor loss I would end up with 20.1 L for the keg. (Don't know that it would fit though since a 5 gal keg is designed to hold only 19L.
__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I met the Boulevard's Brewmaster Friday DannPM General Beer Discussion 1 02-02-2011 04:56 AM
braumeister noobster101 General Beer Discussion 22 06-03-2010 03:50 PM
#1 cool job: brewmaster Spunkmeyer General Beer Discussion 9 06-03-2008 03:50 AM
how to contact sierra nevada brewmaster grrtt78 General Beer Discussion 8 02-07-2007 05:19 PM