Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Speidel Braumeister (brewmaster)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-12-2012, 10:57 PM   #1771
digitaldeluge
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Woodland Hills, CA
Posts: 26
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psehorne View Post
How about now?
Looks great!, 120 is bad enough 240 can really knock you on your a** so better safe then sorry. Especially by a pool.

I predict we will see pictures of a water test soon
__________________
digitaldeluge is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 03:07 AM   #1772
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitaldeluge View Post
I predict we will see pictures of a water test soon
Water test Tuesday.... Assistant Brewer is charging his video camera battery tonight....I've never put anything on YouTube before, but if the video is worthwhile I'll see what I can do....standby...
__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 03:55 PM   #1773
Redstag
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Redstag's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 55
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

__________________
Redstag is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 10:45 PM   #1774
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psehorne View Post
Water test Tuesday.... Assistant Brewer is charging his video camera battery tonight....I've never put anything on YouTube before, but if the video is worthwhile I'll see what I can do....standby...
Water test went very well today. Lot's of video recorded. Will take some time to review and edit.

Some highlights:
We were using only 15 liters of water.
Each mash rest was set at 5 minutes.
Ambient Temperature: 15C
Barometric pressure: 30.52
Ground Elevation: 600 ft
Beginning Water Temperature: 15C
Average water temperature increase: ~1.5C/minute
Time to go from mash-out at 76C to 100C boil (without insulating jacket): 17 min
Time from 76C to 100C with insulating jacket: 15 min

I was concerned that the Braumeister would have a hard time reaching/maintaining a boil with the cool outdoor temp. It did very well. After proving it would get a vigorous boil going without the blanket, we cooled the water to 76C again, installed the blanket, and recorded time to climb from 76C to 100C with the jacket - time 15 minutes, two minutes less than without the jacket.

The first cooling from 100C to 76C was done in two minutes. The second cooling from 100C to 25C took only 9 minutes. I was pumping 12.8C water out of our our swimming pool through a 50' stainless steel immersion wort chiller.

Later...
__________________

Last edited by psehorne; 11-13-2012 at 11:32 PM. Reason: spelling
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 11:54 PM   #1775
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psehorne View Post
It's here! The box is in really good shape (minor scar). So hopefully no damage. Now on to the un-boxing.
The machine was shipped via FedEx. Un-boxing went well. No damage to anything. I took a lot of pics but pruned down to only the few below.

As you can see the Braumeister is packed with multi-layer, heavy-duty corrugated cardboard. There is no 'conventional' packing material; instead, there are sturdy and strategically placed cardboard dividers/spacers.

In the last pic you can see all that was included in my shipment. My unit was provided with the stainless steel fine mesh sieves (vs the cloth version). The optional insulating jacket and two extra sets of fine mesh stainless still sieves are near the right side of the pic.

My pump is the black one.

The only 'installation' that was required was:
1) attach the knob to the lid - no tools required; it threaded on the the provided bolt by hand and tightened against a soft washer. Compressing the washer a little with just hand pressure provided a secure fixture.
2) screw four pegs onto the four bolts that protrude from the mash pipe. Covered the pegs with a napkin to protect the finish and tightened slightly with a pair of pliers.
3) screw the spigot into the female port on the kettle and tighten slightly (only enough to slightly compress the rubber o-ring) with a wrench.
box1.jpg   dscn0347.jpg   dscn0352.jpg   dscn0361.jpg  
__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2012, 01:59 PM   #1776
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default Braumeister 20L factory initial program

  • Mash-in: 38C
  • Phase 1: 5 min @ 53C
  • Phase 2: 30 min @ 63C
  • Phase 3: 30 min @ 73C
  • Phase 4: 15 min @ 78C
  • Phase 5: 0 min @ 78C (Mash-out)
  • Boil: 80 min @ 100C
__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2012, 02:35 PM   #1777
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default Braumeister 20L first brew

Today we will be brewing our first batch on the 20L - not only our first batch on the 20L, but our first batch ever. I hope to capture much of today's activities on video. Hopefully Assistant Brewer Larry remembered to charge the battery of his video recorder last night.

For this first brew we have chosen a simple recipe. Almost a SMASH (single malt and single hops), but not quite. We will be using two malts.

  • 4kg 2-row pale American malt
  • .300 10 degree crystal malt
  • One package of Willamette hops (1 oz/28.35mg)
  • One package of Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast

Our mash schedule is probably more extensive that it needs to be. Everything I've read indicates that with today's highly-modified malts our extensive mash schedule is not necessary, but it shouldn't hurt, and I want to give this first brew every opportunity to succeed. The system is automated; so the complex mash schedule does not complicate our brew day. With today's highly-modified malts some of the comments I have in parenthesis after each mash step may not be pertinent, but they explain my reasoning.

Mash-in: 38C
1) Protein Rest 1: 30 min @ 50C (to develop yeast nutrients)
2) Protein Rest 2: 15 min @ 60C (Improve clarity and foam potential)
3) Beta rest. Saccharification: 20 min @ 66C (for light-bodied beer)
4) Alpha rest. Dextrinization: 0 min at 76 (for heavy-bodied beer)
5) Mash out: 10 min at 76C
Boil: 75 min at 100C
Willamette hops added at 60 min
Irish moss (1 oz/ 28.35mg) and additional 4mg gypsum (see below) added at 15 min

We're using our tap water, which is very, very soft and with very high mineral content (Texas version of Burton) and high pH. Out of the tap the pH was off the scale of my litmus paper on the high side - digital pH meter read 8.4. Yesterday we prepared the water with an initial addition of 4mg of gypsum. This brought the hardness up to between 50 and 100 ppm (litmus paper is not too precise) and the pH down somewhat. We then added 7ml of 85% phosphoric acid (food grade) and the pH dropped to just above our target of 5.8. It was at 6.1. This morning before the brew I will check the pH and hardness again and touch up, with a goal of beginning the mash with 5.8 pH and hardness >50 and <100 (don't want the water too hard during the mash). Near the end of the mash additional gypsum will be added to get the hardness up to ~150 ppm.

I have not made a starter. My plan is make a starter from the wort brewed today. This will mean that pitching yeast will be delayed a bit.

Wish us luck.
__________________

Last edited by psehorne; 11-14-2012 at 02:37 PM. Reason: typo
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 03:35 PM   #1778
digitaldeluge
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Woodland Hills, CA
Posts: 26
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psehorne View Post
Today we will be brewing our first batch on the 20L - not only our first batch on the 20L, but our first batch ever. I hope to capture much of today's activities on video. Hopefully Assistant Brewer Larry remembered to charge the battery of his video recorder last night.

For this first brew we have chosen a simple recipe. Almost a SMASH (single malt and single hops), but not quite. We will be using two malts.
  • 4kg 2-row pale American malt
  • .300 10 degree crystal malt
  • One package of Willamette hops (1 oz/28.35mg)
  • One package of Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast

Our mash schedule is probably more extensive that it needs to be. Everything I've read indicates that with today's highly-modified malts our extensive mash schedule is not necessary, but it shouldn't hurt, and I want to give this first brew every opportunity to succeed. The system is automated; so the complex mash schedule does not complicate our brew day. With today's highly-modified malts some of the comments I have in parenthesis after each mash step may not be pertinent, but they explain my reasoning.

Mash-in: 38C
1) Protein Rest 1: 30 min @ 50C (to develop yeast nutrients)
2) Protein Rest 2: 15 min @ 60C (Improve clarity and foam potential)
3) Beta rest. Saccharification: 20 min @ 66C (for light-bodied beer)
4) Alpha rest. Dextrinization: 0 min at 76 (for heavy-bodied beer)
5) Mash out: 10 min at 76C
Boil: 75 min at 100C
Willamette hops added at 60 min
Irish moss (1 oz/ 28.35mg) and additional 4mg gypsum (see below) added at 15 min

We're using our tap water, which is very, very soft and with very high mineral content (Texas version of Burton) and high pH. Out of the tap the pH was off the scale of my litmus paper on the high side - digital pH meter read 8.4. Yesterday we prepared the water with an initial addition of 4mg of gypsum. This brought the hardness up to between 50 and 100 ppm (litmus paper is not too precise) and the pH down somewhat. We then added 7ml of 85% phosphoric acid (food grade) and the pH dropped to just above our target of 5.8. It was at 6.1. This morning before the brew I will check the pH and hardness again and touch up, with a goal of beginning the mash with 5.8 pH and hardness >50 and <100 (don't want the water too hard during the mash). Near the end of the mash additional gypsum will be added to get the hardness up to ~150 ppm.

I have not made a starter. My plan is make a starter from the wort brewed today. This will mean that pitching yeast will be delayed a bit.

Wish us luck.
change the boil to 102
__________________
digitaldeluge is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 03:42 PM   #1779
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitaldeluge View Post
change the boil to 102
I increased it to 101C and started to get boil over. Had to baby sit it to keep it from boiling over.
__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 04:04 PM   #1780
psehorne
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hidden Valley Airpark, Shady Shores, Texas
Posts: 65
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default First Brew Problem with grain overflowing malt pipe

We had a near catastrophe yesterday

When it came time to lift the malt pipe, I removed the wing nut and the top sieves and the grain under them suddenly rose, and before I could react, were 1/8" above the top of the malt pipe and grain was overflowing into the outer compartment. It took quite a bit of effort for the Assistant Brewer and I to hold the sieves down, to stop the overflow of grain. And because of the downward pressure we were holding on the sieves, even more effort to lift the malt pipe up. A lot of grain ended up in the wort.

We strained all we could out and proceeded. Although there was a lot of grain in the wort, the pump had no problem.

I've read this thread in its entirely and do not remember anyone reporting this occurrence; so I wasn't prepared for it and it took me completely by surprise.

__________________
psehorne is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I met the Boulevard's Brewmaster Friday DannPM General Beer Discussion 1 02-02-2011 04:56 AM
braumeister noobster101 General Beer Discussion 22 06-03-2010 03:50 PM
#1 cool job: brewmaster Spunkmeyer General Beer Discussion 9 06-03-2008 03:50 AM
how to contact sierra nevada brewmaster grrtt78 General Beer Discussion 8 02-07-2007 05:19 PM