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Old 01-18-2005, 01:35 PM   #1
ESPY
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Default Smaller batch sizes

I've found a great deal on a complete set of "standard" equipment and I'm considering upgrading from my MrBeer kit. But one of the things I really like about MrBeer is the smaller batch size. Are there any disadvantages to using the larger set of equipment to make only 2-3 gallons at a time?

From what I understand, it won't hurt anything to have extra space in the primary fermenter because the yeast needs oxygen anyway. Is that correct? I guess that's my biggest concern, because the set of equipment I'll be getting will include a 3-gal glass carboy (along with two 5-gal too ). I've also heard that it's good to reduce the exposure to air in the secondary fermenter by filling it as much as possible. True?

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Old 01-18-2005, 01:44 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESPY
I've found a great deal on a complete set of "standard" equipment and I'm considering upgrading from my MrBeer kit. But one of the things I really like about MrBeer is the smaller batch size. Are there any disadvantages to using the larger set of equipment to make only 2-3 gallons at a time?

From what I understand, it won't hurt anything to have extra space in the primary fermenter because the yeast needs oxygen anyway. Is that correct? I guess that's my biggest concern, because the set of equipment I'll be getting will include a 3-gal glass carboy (along with two 5-gal too ). I've also heard that it's good to reduce the exposure to air in the secondary fermenter by filling it as much as possible. True?
Right now I'm using the True Brew kit, which has a 5 gallon primary, and 5 gallon bottling bucket. I bought another 5 gallon carboy for my secondary needs. The size of thse buckets really works well. Like, I usually ferment 5 gallons, but after transferring and bottling, you do end up with slightly less. I mean, I'm not in it for mass production...yet ...and I figure as a newbie, smaller, controlled batches are easier to handle....hope that helps!!!
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Old 01-18-2005, 02:06 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by NUCC98
Right now I'm using the True Brew kit, which has a 5 gallon primary, and 5 gallon bottling bucket. I bought another 5 gallon carboy for my secondary needs. The size of thse buckets really works well. Like, I usually ferment 5 gallons, but after transferring and bottling, you do end up with slightly less. I mean, I'm not in it for mass production...yet ...and I figure as a newbie, smaller, controlled batches are easier to handle....hope that helps!!!
I use a 6.5 gallon primary for my 3 gallon batches. My secondary is a 3 gallon glass carboy. From what I have heard.......and read.....Air space is more important with wines, but with beer, or at least any beer that I have made, if the yeast is still working it has disapated most of the air that would be on top. And typically your beer is not going to stay in the secondary that long,unless your making a lager, barely wine, or something with a high alcohol content, then of course It would take longer. If your making a beer that needs a bit of conditioning, then why not filler up to the top, but for a 1 week, 2 week, 3 week brew I dont see anything wrong with head space. What does everyone else think?
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Old 01-18-2005, 02:55 PM   #4
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The wort need to be aerated only once, right after chilling and before adding the yeast. You can shake your fermentor to aerate. After that step, aeration is something to avoid, but not a problem usually.

Airspace in the secondary is no big deal. The CO2 produced by the yeast quickly displaces the air. And since it's not a hugely long-lived product like wine, aeration isn't all that big a deal.

Try to avoid it, yes, but don't worry about it too much.

I think you'll be happy moving up to a regular setup. I imagine you'll move up to 5 gallon batches soon, too, since, bottling aside, it's about the same amount of work no matter how much beer you make.

Janx

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