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Old 07-28-2008, 01:03 AM   #51
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Getting back to what acient people may have done is most likely nothing. If you listen to Charlie from Five Star talk about sanatizing, you don't have to do it as long as you clean well. Sanatizing is like insurance. You don't really need it but its nice to have.

By the way, some written history is half made up and pre-history is mostly made up. Dating prehistory is no where near an exact science and should be taken with a grain of salt. They just don't really know.

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Old 07-28-2008, 10:40 PM   #52
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You are partially correct, but there are scientific ways to determine when (for example) barley was first domesticated. Barley is believed to be the first crop domesticated by humans. Carbon dating items from arceological dig sites, and tracking the rates of genetic mutation in various domesticated plants vs. their wild relatives are common ways that modern anthropologists use to determine the onset of agriculture and plant domestication in various regions. It follows to reason that the brewing of beer coincided more or less with the earliest examples of grain cultivation, which first took place in the fertile crescent ~10,000 years ago.

Some of the evidence for mead making comes from pre-historic drawings showing a human harvesting honey from a bee's nest. These can also be dated through various methods. One such drawing dates to over 40,000 years old.

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Old 07-29-2008, 03:26 AM   #53
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You have to be careful with carbon dating too. They will retest samples until they get results they think are right.

When they date things in prehistory, its only dating based on what a bunch of people think built on what other people think, built on what other people of what they find around, like pottery. They are making a hugh assumption that the pottery or whatever was dated correctly in the first place.

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Old 07-29-2008, 03:34 AM   #54
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I don't think anyone has mentioned that ancient brewing actually depended on a certain LACK of sanitation. Yeast wasn't discovered until very recent history, so wild yeast and/or even bacterial infections were REQUIRED at some point in brewing's past.

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Old 10-28-2009, 02:48 AM   #55
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Brewing in ancient Ireland, including the brewing process.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/n...nd/6941951.stm


After achieving an optimum temperature of 60-70°C they began to add milled barley and approximately 45 minutes later simply baled the final product into fermentation vessels.

"It tasted like a traditional ale, but was sweeter because there were no hops in it."

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Old 10-28-2009, 02:51 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanier01 View Post
Brewing in ancient Ireland, including the brewing process.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/n...nd/6941951.stm


After achieving an optimum temperature of 60-70°C they began to add milled barley and approximately 45 minutes later simply baled the final product into fermentation vessels.

"It tasted like a traditional ale, but was sweeter because there were no hops in it."
Ain't beer history cool?

Great article and great question, btw...

Look up gruit, fyi
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Old 12-16-2009, 03:45 PM   #57
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I do not think it was mentioned but brewing WAS the sanitation. The ancient Egyptians make so no difference between grain and beer. They would make beer from gain just as naturally as they made bread from it (it actually is the basis of Egyptian beer).

The beer we drink today, that is fermented malt with flowers (Hops) added is Celtic in origin. The Celts would add flowers to the beer (it can only be guessed why, but they made tea from them too). This was mostly Heather and Mugwort (yes I have tried it, it is nasty).

It was not until the Romans came along that they introduced Hops. They were included in Pliny the Elders Natural History ""Naturalis Historia". Beer at that time was still made bitter by adding more accessible flowers and roots. It was not until about 1100AD that the actual preservative qualities of Hops were observed (at least this is when it became a standard pratice). This is when they added a flower, that is not native, and intentionally started to cultivate it for preserving beer.

Ancients probably did not know why vinegar, alcohol and salt preserved foods. They knew it did though. I am nearly certain at least some cultures believed it was A Gift from the(a) God(s), why else would He/She/It/They have given us a substance that makes it so we do not starve in winter. If you do not know how it works then it must work by magic.

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Old 12-16-2009, 04:28 PM   #58
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