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-   -   Questions about March Pumps answered by the Factory! (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/questions-about-march-pumps-answered-factory-210199/)

WalterAtMarchPump 12-06-2010 07:45 PM

Questions about March Pumps answered by the Factory!
 
Greetings from March Pumps! My name is Walter and I am one of the engineers here, and I will gladly answer any questions you may have on our products. You can post them here and I will reply for all to see. Or you can PM me. Or you can call the factory direct and ask for either Hans or Walter in engineering. (800)323-0791
:D
Happy Brewing

-Walter

Randar 12-06-2010 07:51 PM

Since you are in Glenview and I am in Wheeling, what kind of local discounts can I get and how much home brew is required to get a "freebee!" :-P

On a more serious note, since most of the pumps are not rated for boiling temps, what is the limitation in the rating system? Is it simply a certification issue that costs money to certify them for boiling temps or is there inherent danger in using standard brewing march pumps at boiling temps due to materials used? Or is it some other mechanical issue?

Cheers!

WalterAtMarchPump 12-06-2010 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Randar (Post 2456395)
Since you are in Glenview and I am in Wheeling, what kind of local discounts can I get and how much home brew is required to get a "freebee!" :-P

On a more serious note, since most of the pumps are not rated for boiling temps, what is the limitation in the rating system? Is it simply a certification issue that costs money to certify them for boiling temps or is there inherent danger in using standard brewing march pumps at boiling temps due to materials used? Or is it some other mechanical issue?

Cheers!

The 809 is rated for liquid temps of 250*F well above the boiling point of 212*F
Certification of anything depending on what you want to do with it. To get NSF rating for instance we would need to nail the pump down for one application. If we wanted it to be used for beer transfer, it can be done.....problem comes into play when anything besides beer is put through the pump later. If for instance you cleaned it out with some sort of alcohol base disinfectant then the rating would be null/void. Most time's the company requesting the ratings will be putting together a complete unit or system that includes our pump in the assembly. That entire unit goes through the NSF certification process and is nailed down for one application and that would include anything involved with that process. Our pumps are used in so many applications it would be crazy expensive to get certifications for all possible scenarios. Just to give you a few examples, these 809's are used in transfer of hot vegetable oil, radiant flooring systems with glycol mixtures, hot water recirc for homes, solar hot water systems, there's a MAJOR electronics company that uses these in their chiller systems for computer cooling, there's a few automotive company's playing with these for possible electric car applications. Granted not all the examples I gave are food related but it just goes to show you that they are used in a variety of applications!

As for the second part of your question: "Is it simply a certification issue that costs money to certify them for boiling temps or is there inherent danger in using standard brewing march pumps at boiling temps due to materials used? Or is it some other mechanical issue?"

There's actually a few different reasons...and its not really a certification thing as much as its a magnetism/mechanical issue. The plastic pumps are only rated to withstand 50psi of internal pressure. In beer brewing you will never see that because you are not running a closed loop system that can build up pressure. Also with mag-drive pumps, the weak point will always be the mag-drive itself. On these 809's for instance we will start to loose magnetism in the magnets around 250*F.....each time you overheat the magnets you will loose about 10% of the magnetic strength....do it enough times and you will ruin the magnets all together. You can get stronger magnets like neodymium but then the costs go up with that and most people don't require temps above 250*F. We do have a cast iron pump (our 869) that can take 350*F liquid temps...but its running at a slow speed and has slightly stronger magnets. And we have done some "government" projects in the past with some of our bigger pumps that have withstood temps of 500*F and pressures of 1000psi! :eek: But that was with a "moneys no object" budget :D


-Walter

Hermit 12-06-2010 09:24 PM

I'll be interested in what you find after examining you 'competitor's' product. While making beer at home doesn't require precision instruments, attention to detail does say something about the process. Can't drill a hole fairly close to center on a casting or just don't care to? Need to get a part later? Chinese factories are notorious for only wanting to do large runs. The factory making pumps today may be making dolls tomorrow.

halucin8 12-06-2010 09:29 PM

Does March make any type of affordable self-priming, variable speed pump that can be used for homebrewing?

Randar 12-06-2010 09:31 PM

Walter, thanks for the detailed response! Great information!

the_bird 12-06-2010 09:47 PM

Huh, never would have thought the temperature rating was related to the magnets; assumed it was related to the material used in the pump head. Thanks for the info!

nicadrick 12-06-2010 10:04 PM

Walter, I have an 809 that seemed to lock up on me (temporarily). I turned it off and loosened it from it's mount, put it all back together and now it is fine. This got me thinking about routine maintenance. Can you tell us what type of routine maintenance/interval should be done to these pumps?

Thanks!

Irrenarzt 12-06-2010 10:04 PM

Great to see March here on the boards. I have 4 809 pumps and generally, they work great. The priming issue can be a challenge at times but over time, I have become more adept and dealing with my system and priming issues.

What's the story with the Morebeer March pump I saw an ad for recently? They claimed faster pumping speeds with a few minor tweaks. Does this pump prime more easily than the current pumphead? Can you make suggestions as to reducing cavitation and getting things to flow a bit more easily?

Also, how about a part number for a stainless head with opposing 1/2 MNPT threads to replace the polysulfone ones I currently use? I have a great March dealer in Albuquerque I deal with and can order through them. Thanks Walter. Appreciate the homebrew love.

Sawdustguy 12-06-2010 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by halucin8 (Post 2456659)
Does March make any type of affordable self-priming, variable speed pump that can be used for homebrewing?

+1 Is there a reason why nobody makes an affordable self priming magnetic drive pump?


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