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-   -   Propane Regulator for Oxygen? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/propane-regulator-oxygen-332017/)

AnthonyCB 05-30-2012 11:18 AM

Propane Regulator for Oxygen?
 
Hey everyone,

I'd just buy one of the Williams Oxygenation kits if I were living in the states, but I live here in France. I have a .5 micron stainless aeration stone and I've located a few different disposable oxygen canisters at the local building supply place:

http://www.leroymerlin.fr/v3/p/produ...express-e66912

or

http://www.leroymerlin.fr/v3/p/produ...al-gmbh-e67009

I know nothing about the format of the attachments for these bottles beyond what is available on the web.

Does anyone know what I am looking for as far as a regulator goes? I've seen quite a few for propane. Is there any difference? What flow rate am I looking to be able to achieve? Also, does anyone have an estimate on the number of liters of oxygen consumed each time you oxygenate a standard 5ish gallon batch?

Thanks,

Anthony

cockybitz 05-31-2012 12:59 AM

It appears that an o2 can should get you 8-5 gallon batches. This should give you 12ppm o2, and anything more is a waste. The difference with propane regulators is propane is standard threads, but o2 threads are left hand threads.

P-J 05-31-2012 09:59 AM

Do not ever try to adapt a regulator to an OČ tank. That is an extremely bad idea & you will be playing "you bet your life".

Use an Oxygen regulator only.

audger 05-31-2012 01:40 PM

propane and oxygen cylinders have opposite threads so you can not attach a propane regulator on an O2 cylinder, or vice versa, even if you tried to (which is a bad idea anyway).

Phyrst 05-31-2012 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by P-J (Post 4131474)
Do not ever try to adapt a regulator to an OČ tank. That is an extremely bad idea & you will be playing "you bet your life".

Use an Oxygen regulator only.

Amen to this. I work in the cryogenic gas industry. My company makes liquid oxygen and nitrogen. Oxygen systems need to be specifically designed for oxygen use. Things you wouldn't normally think as flammable in regular air can be extremely flammable in pure oxygen atmospheres. Think things like gaskets, lubricants, seals, etc. In addition, the valve and regular parts should be stainless steel or monel. Carbon steel can ignite if the gas velocity is too high. And when it ignites, it's not a slow burn. It's an explosion. Then if you have stainless steel tubing hooked up to the valve or regulator, that will burn too. Then your oxygen cylinder will go off. Are you getting the idea here? I've seen men die from chain reactions like this.

When ordering valves and regulators for oxygen service you should try to buy it directly from the vendor. Don't take the word of Jack from the auto body shop that's selling you a second hand part. Always specify that the valve or regulator will be used in oxygen service and ask them to have it "oxygen cleaned". It may cost you a few extra dollars, but if there is any residual lubricant from machining the parts you are looking at a very hazardous situation. Also, make sure your hands are clean when handling oxygen valves and parts. If you have grease all over your hands and that grease gets on the inside of the valve, even a tiny bit, it will ignite and your whole system will go up with it.

Yes, I'm trying to scare you. Pure oxygen is dangerous stuff, and the hazards are real.

diverpat 05-31-2012 02:07 PM

Oxygen under pressure plus hydrocarbons leads to fire which leads to explosion in a pressurized system. VERY VERY bad idea!

Phyrst 05-31-2012 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by diverpat (Post 4131917)
Oxygen under pressure plus hydrocarbons leads to fire which leads to explosion in a pressurized system. VERY VERY bad idea!

And again, what people don't recognize is that carbon steel and stainless steel will burn in pure oxygen too. It has a high ignition temperature, but if there is a little bit of oil or grease in your system and that ignites, that's all it takes and everything else is going up with it. Sometimes it doesn't even take an ignition source. Putting high velocity (>38 ft/sec) through a stainless steel valve can ignite it. This is why you should always put a regulator on your cylinders. Don't think you will just put a valve on there and slightly crack it open. The velocity going through that crack with the high pressure in the cylinder will be too great and you are running the risk of the valve igniting.

AnthonyCB 05-31-2012 10:06 PM

I'd like to thank everyone for their efforts to prevent me from blowing myself up! :ban:

Does anyone know what I am looking for as far as threading size for these disposable type cylinders? Any idea what the standard is in the US? I can take some measurements at the store and maybe pick something up the next time I am visiting home?

Phyrst 06-01-2012 01:35 PM

The threads should be the same on any oxygen cylinder regardless of the size. I would suggest you find a local welding supply shop and go there. Find someone who works there and tell them you need a regulator you plan to use in oxygen service. They will hook you up.

AnthonyCB 06-01-2012 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phyrst (Post 4135015)
The threads should be the same on any oxygen cylinder regardless of the size. I would suggest you find a local welding supply shop and go there. Find someone who works there and tell them you need a regulator you plan to use in oxygen service. They will hook you up.

Thanks for the advice Phyrst. I've been trying to get as much info as I can before going this route because, my French is fine for renting a car or buying cheese, but a funny thing happens when I try to make a joke or ask for something a little off kilter. People assume they haven't understood me correctly. As such, I didn't/don't feel confident in my ability to go to a welding supplier and explain to him that I wanted to buy equipment to put oxygen in my unfermented beer to feed yeast.


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