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Old 01-07-2013, 05:58 PM   #1
kontrol
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Default Pot size for extract full boil / all grain

I currently do 6 GAL batch with a 15L pot. Since my pot isn't big enough I must do partial boil.

I'm highly interested in doing full batch so I'm looking for a new pot. I would like to know what size of pot should I be looking for to make full boil with extract?

And I know in a near future when I will be comfortable with the brewing process using extract that I will want to move to a all grain process. I was wondering if I would require the same pot size than when doing full boil with extract.

I will always (Or so I think) do 6 GAL batch because it makes a good amount of bottle, not too much and not too less. I prefer brewing many times and drinking new stuff than drinking the same thing for too long .

And does anyone know how heavy (how many L to make thing easy) can I put on those glassy stove-top (I don't know the english term sorry) before it break. I was wondering if I could do 6 GAL full boil on these or should I really need a propane burner or some electric one.

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Old 01-07-2013, 06:56 PM   #2
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The pot size would be the same for doing a full boil for both extract and all-grain.

If you're looking to bottle 6 gallons, I'd probably look at an 8 gallon kettle minimum, probably even 10. You might be able to squeak by with a smaller kettle, but doing 5 gallons, I'd usually start a boil with 6.5 - 7 gallons to have enough with evaporation and fermenter losses.

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Old 01-07-2013, 07:04 PM   #3
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I wouldn't go smaller than a 10 gallon kettle personally.

-Ben

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Old 01-07-2013, 07:06 PM   #4
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4 gallons is difficult for my stove to hold at a boil with the top off. I can't imagine 6 or 8 on a stove top working very well. It sounds like you should be looking into a turkey frier.

6 gallon batches are pretty big, and if you are looking to make beer that is above 7%ABV you're going to need a big pot.

Something like this:
Backyard Classic Professional 36 Qt. Turkey Fryer

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Old 01-07-2013, 07:12 PM   #5
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8 gallons minimum. 10 gallons would be preferred.

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Old 01-07-2013, 07:15 PM   #6
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it's possible that you can boil on a stove top but it will take a looong time to get it going. I'd highly recomend a propane burner and brewing outdoors. Also, an immersion chiller will be a must have item so you can cool things down at the end of the boil.

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Old 01-07-2013, 07:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maida7 View Post
it's possible that you can boil on a stove top but it will take a looong time to get it going. I'd highly recomend a propane burner and brewing outdoors. Also, an immersion chiller will be a must have item so you can cool things down at the end of the boil.
I already have a IC. My partial boil gets cold very fast lol.

Outdoor brewing is not much of an option for me, specially during winter.
So a full boil for a 6 GAL batch might be too long to do on a stovetop? Damn.

I was already thinking getting an electric heater (I heard some people use hot water tank heater elements). Propane is also not much of an option if I really plan to always brew inside.
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:50 PM   #8
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I've done it on a stove top so it can be done. It just takes a super long time to get things boiling. A heat stick (one of those homemade water heater element things) would be perfect for helping the stove. Go for it.

All the propane burners I know of are for outdoors.

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Old 01-07-2013, 07:56 PM   #9
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If you plan on possible going all grain down the road, one easy/cheaper option is BIAB. You can do 6 gallon BIAB batch with a 40qt (10g) kettle. I would recommend a 60qt (15g) however.

I now wish I would have a purchased a 60+ qt kettle. This will allow for a very high gravity 5.5-6 gallon batch, or a 10g regular gravity batch.

I never thought I would go to 10g, but for no more time or effort I can get a nice pipeline going.
Good luck

Chris

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Old 01-07-2013, 08:02 PM   #10
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Yeah a heat stick + the stove might be a good idea.

I'm planing to build myself a mash tun with a cooler, so I won't be doing BIAB.

But why do very high gravity batch would need a bigger pot?

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