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Old 10-02-2006, 09:06 PM   #1
ebhomey
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Default Plate chiller vs. immersion

OK, what is the deal? Give me your opinions! I seem to think that the plate chiller will be more effective.

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Old 10-02-2006, 09:08 PM   #2
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http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthre...hlight=chiller

Oops, sorry that link is for plate vs. counterflow. . .

I'd say plate over immersion every time.
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Old 10-02-2006, 10:00 PM   #3
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A plate chiller would unquestionably be more efficient than an immersion chiller. The problem with them is that they will clog with hop debris and they seem like they would be a pain to clean.

That being said, I have an immersion chiller that I have been pretty happy with.

- magno

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Old 10-03-2006, 02:27 PM   #4
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I've got a Shirron plate chiller and have only used it 8 times since I got it a couple months back. As Magno suggested it can have its drawbacks; however, I was able to rememdy the problem with hops by adding a length of stainless steel braided hose inside my keggle. This addition hasn't affected the flow rate to date but that doesn't mean that it won't. For less than $3.00 I found an attachment at one of the big box stores that fits my water hose and the plate chiller; this attachment allows for easy backflush and cleaning. After chilling the wort I attach the backflush to the wort out side and turn on the water. Meanwhile I'll aerate the wort, pitch the yeast and then come back to the plate chiller. To dry it I toss it in the oven at 250°F for 15-20 minutes. No visual buildup yet but I'll let everyone know if I have problems with my current procedure of cleaning. I highly recommend it BUT I do wish it had bolts on the back for easy mounting to my brewstand.

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Old 10-08-2006, 05:38 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magno
A plate chiller would unquestionably be more efficient than an immersion chiller. The problem with them is that they will clog with hop debris and they seem like they would be a pain to clean.

That being said, I have an immersion chiller that I have been pretty happy with.

- magno
That problem is easily to remedy with the right equipment. I have had not problems whatsoever, but my false bottoms is very tight and fine. As far as cleaning, no problem, I have an adaptor that hooks up to my garden hose that I use as soon as I am done collecting wort.

Don't let the fear of using more effective equipment stand in the way of improving your beer.

But most importantly, what ever makes you happy is what's most important.
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Old 10-08-2006, 07:45 AM   #6
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one problem to consider is DMS. This compound, which gives the beer a cooked corn aroma and taste is formed from its precurser SMM during high temperatures. Its majority is cerated and boiled off during the wort boiling. Especially for shorter boils and when low temp kilned malts (like pilsner and pale malt) are used a significant amount of SMM is present when the boil is over. If you use an immersion chiller, you are getting all the wort pretty quickly below 140*F, which is frequently mentioned as the temp at which the DMS production ceases. With a counter flow chiller (including plate chiller) you leave a lot of the wort above 140F for quite some time. This will increased the DMS content in your wort and may get it above the perception threshold.

So, if you are brewing lighter beers use a counterflow chiller and are noticing DMS in your beer, you may want to try an immersion chiller.

Many mircobreweries seem to have a problem with DMS in their lagers. Just today I had the Oktoberfest from the Paper City Brewing company in Holyoke, MA and I noticed a slight cooked corn smell that dissipated pretty quickly though.

Jamil from The Brewing Network had a pretty good idea on making an immersion chiller more efficiant: http://www.mrmalty.com/chiller.php


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Old 10-08-2006, 08:02 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
... If you use a counterflow chiller, you are getting all the wort pretty quickly below 140*F, which is frequently mentioned as the temp at which the DMS production ceases. With a counter flow chiller (including plate chiller) you leave a lot of the wort above 140F for quite some time.
In the first reference to counterflow chiller, did you mean to say immersion chiller?
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Old 10-08-2006, 08:08 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beer4breakfast
In the first reference to counterflow chiller, did you mean to say immersion chiller?
Thanks,
I edited the post.

Kai
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Old 10-08-2006, 07:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
one problem to consider is DMS. This compound, which gives the beer a cooked corn aroma and taste is formed from its precurser SMM during high temperatures. Its majority is cerated and boiled off during the wort boiling. Especially for shorter boils and when low temp kilned malts (like pilsner and pale malt) are used a significant amount of SMM is present when the boil is over. If you use an immersion chiller, you are getting all the wort pretty quickly below 140*F, which is frequently mentioned as the temp at which the DMS production ceases. With a counter flow chiller (including plate chiller) you leave a lot of the wort above 140F for quite some time. This will increased the DMS content in your wort and may get it above the perception threshold.

So, if you are brewing lighter beers use a counterflow chiller and are noticing DMS in your beer, you may want to try an immersion chiller.

Many mircobreweries seem to have a problem with DMS in their lagers. Just today I had the Oktoberfest from the Paper City Brewing company in Holyoke, MA and I noticed a slight cooked corn smell that dissipated pretty quickly though.

Jamil from The Brewing Network had a pretty good idea on making an immersion chiller more efficiant: http://www.mrmalty.com/chiller.php
I'm not sure I understand. But I have a question anyways, at what high temp are you safe from dms. It is not something you have to worry about when you are boiling is it? When I turn my boil off it is taking less than ten minutes to collect my wort. I am averaging about 1.2 gallons per minute (just a guess). My wort is still at a very high temp (over 200) until it has drained out of my kettle. My collected wort is about 70f for ales. Am I close enough to boiling temps to be safe?

Can excessive dms be formed if you boil to long?
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Old 10-09-2006, 12:43 AM   #10
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Like Kaiser said, the compound that causes DMS is SMM.... it is created during the boil BUT the boil itself drives off this compound. It is only after the boil stops that you are no longer driving it off and DMS can form when the wort is over 140 F. By lowering the temp below 140 as quickly as possible, you can limit its effects. I have no problem getting below 140 within about 5 minutes with an immersion chiller. Now getting below 80 ... that takes a while. I want to go with Jamil's immersion/wirlpool method someday.... when I get a pump.

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