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Old 11-17-2013, 02:58 AM   #1
dgrhodes
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Default Natural gas brewing help

I have been reading for some time now about brewing with natural gas, it seems like all the threads get started and end abruptly when talking about the methods they used, with no clear resolution. I'd like to start brewing with natural gas and I'm down to two choices:

1. Buying a banjo burner and the conversion from Williams brewing.

2. Buying a 10 tip jet burner and ball valve.

Does anyone have any definitive opinions on these two choices and preferences? Is there another option I'm missing?

Hopefully someone out there has experience brewing with natural gas and can explain why they like one better than the other of the two choice I listed above.

Thanks in advance guys!

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Old 11-17-2013, 02:33 PM   #2
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I use a banjo with ng and it works great for me. I've read the tip burners are only best at full throttle. I just wanted something with more adjustment.

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Old 11-17-2013, 04:50 PM   #3
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The principles between using Natural Gas and Propane are identical...

The major difference is the pressure at which they operate and the BTU content. Propane has smaller orifices as they typically run at a pressure of 11" water column (0.4 psi) and natural gas runs at a pressure of 3.5" water column (0.125 psi) so the orifice sizes are larger.

Banjo burners have adjustable primary air shutter which allow you to fine tune the gas air mixture if you're wanting to throttle back the gas. Where as the jet type burners don't have an adjustable primary air shutter and rely on the gas pressure to pull in primary air through a fixed primary air opening.

So depending on how adjustable you want your burner it determines which burner to get.

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Old 11-17-2013, 05:13 PM   #4
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Well, I'm just getting my feet wet brewing extract batches, but within the next year I'd like to go all grain. So I think I'll start with the banjo burner and the orifice from Williams brewing. Would the jet burner be good for heating sparge water or just a straight boil that wouldn't need much fine tuning?

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Old 11-17-2013, 10:26 PM   #5
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I'd just stick with banjo burners. The primary design of a jet burner is for a commercial wok.

If you've ever been in a commercial kitchen / restaurant you'll find all their gas garland stock pot burners are of a design similar to a banjo burner. They just have multiple orifices for each ring of the burner where the banjo has one orifice for the whole burner. Google "three ring burner" and you'll see what most cooks use in their kitchens.

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Old 11-17-2013, 10:33 PM   #6
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I have 2 bg-12 burners and 1 6 in burner which originally ran on propane. I ordered a second of orifices and drilled them out to around 1/8 inch, before they were smaller than 1/64inch. I love brewing with natural gas, heats as well as propane but never have to worry about running out since I always do double 5 gal batches.

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Old 11-18-2013, 07:02 AM   #7
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I use a 10 jet burner with NG and love it. Can be adjusted down very low with no sooting. It dose get hot enough on high to to turn the metal bars under my keggle cherry red. You never have to worry about running out of propane half way through a brew.

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Old 11-19-2013, 11:55 PM   #8
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I currently use this Bayou Classic SQ14 for pressure canning:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I think I'm going to email Bayou Classic to order a new orifice and attempt to drill this out myself before making any large investments. That way, if I screw it up, then I still have my functional propane orifice.

I'll keep you guys updated to let you know how this goes. One of the frustrations I've found with looking at natural gas conversions is that people don't follow up on their posts regarding conversions. If I go this route I'll be sure to keep you updated.

Ultimately I will be buying another burner at a later date. So if I were to go with a jet burner, I'm only planning on doing 5gal, maybe 10 gal batches at most, so I imagine that a 10 jet burner would be ok?

Also I assume that a banjo burner would be sufficient for a 10 gal batch.

Thanks everyone for your help! I appreciate it!

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Old 11-20-2013, 12:57 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sachsebrewer View Post
I have 2 bg-12 burners and 1 6 in burner which originally ran on propane. I ordered a second of orifices and drilled them out to around 1/8 inch, before they were smaller than 1/64inch. I love brewing with natural gas, heats as well as propane but never have to worry about running out since I always do double 5 gal batches.
I realized my current SQ14 has a BG12 burner on it, I went out to look at it just a few minutes ago and found "BG12" staring me in the face.

Would you be willing to snap a photo of your connection to the burner and what it cost you for the orifice + shipping. The only orifice listed on bayou classic's webpage is a 1/4" and as I understand it, the bg12 takes a 1/8" orifice.
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Old 11-20-2013, 05:39 AM   #10
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Here's a link to an orifice drill size chart... http://www.hvacredu.net/gas-codes/mo...ty%20Chart.pdf

Best practice is to start two drill sizes smaller and then ream to final size.

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