Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Idea for a RIMS Heater

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-08-2007, 01:25 AM   #1
torpshootr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
torpshootr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Montgomery, AL
Posts: 39
Default Idea for a RIMS Heater

I am building a home brewery and am considering the addition of a RIMS heater. My preference is to use RIMS vice HERMS. Based on my reading, it seems that the most prevalent argument against the use of RIMS is the possibility of scorching the wort since most RIMS heaters use a water heater element that is in the recirculated wort flow. So, I was thinking that instead of using a water heater element in direct contact with the wort, I could possibly use flexible heating strips wrapped around the outside of the heating chamber. The heater would be controlled via a temperture controller (possibly a Ranco ETC) with its thermistor on the outlet of the chamber.

Has anyone used this method or know of someone who has? If so, does it work? Any lessons learned that I could make use of?

Cheers,
Ken

__________________
torpshootr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-08-2007, 08:43 AM   #2
brewman !
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,227
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

You could use heat tape and such. That would certainly help on the issue of scorching the wort. Anything to increase the surface area of the heating element and limit the surface temp to 200F ish will help.

__________________

Getting back into brewing...

brewman ! is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-08-2007, 03:36 PM   #3
torpshootr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
torpshootr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Montgomery, AL
Posts: 39
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brewman !
Anything to increase the surface area of the heating element and limit the surface temp to 200F ish will help.
My thought was to construct the heater of 1/2" SS pipe. Most RIMS heaters seem to be made of 1 1/2" pipe so that they are large enough to insert the water heater element. With my idea of wrapping the pipe with heating tape, the chamber itself (ie. the pipe) becomes the heating element for the wort. By using smaller size pipe a greater percentage of the wort is maintained in contact with the heating chamber, which should increase its efficiency.

Cheers,
Ken
__________________
torpshootr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-08-2007, 09:49 PM   #4
brewman !
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,227
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

"My thought was to construct the heater of 1/2" SS pipe."

You have to watch that you have enough surface area to transfer the heat. Copper is a much better conductor of heat than SS is.

"Most RIMS heaters seem to be made of 1 1/2" pipe so that they are large enough to insert the water heater element. With my idea of wrapping the pipe with heating tape, the chamber itself (ie. the pipe) becomes the heating element for the wort. By using smaller size pipe a greater percentage of the wort is maintained in contact with the heating chamber, which should increase its efficiency."

The other issue with heat tape is finding stuff that will work to the desired temps (200F?) and having enough pipe to get enough on to get the required wattage. (Power actually...) I wouldn't build anything less than 1 or 1.5KW, especially if you intend to do step mashes.

__________________

Getting back into brewing...

brewman ! is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-08-2007, 11:13 PM   #5
kladue
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Turner, Oregon, Oregon most of the time now
Posts: 2,306
Liked 47 Times on 43 Posts

Default

Have you taken a look at the open coil water heater elements that fit inside the pipe as an alternative to external heating elements. These type of heating elements are available from plumbing supply and online sources with wattages to 1750W@120 VAC, and if i remember correctly they used to fit inside 1-1/2" pipe that passed through the water heater tank.

__________________
kladue is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-08-2007, 11:41 PM   #6
torpshootr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
torpshootr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Montgomery, AL
Posts: 39
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue
Have you taken a look at the open coil water heater elements that fit inside the pipe as an alternative to external heating elements. These type of heating elements are available from plumbing supply and online sources with wattages to 1750W@120 VAC, and if i remember correctly they used to fit inside 1-1/2" pipe that passed through the water heater tank.
I'm either not following you or you are suggesting exactly what I am trying to avoid.

Ken
__________________
torpshootr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2007, 12:02 AM   #7
brewman !
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,227
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

The problem with using a lot of open coil water heater elements is that the power level per square inch is too high and it scorches the wort <if run at full power>

Look on McMasterCarr's website for info. They list watts/in^2 for all their heaters.

__________________

Getting back into brewing...

brewman ! is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2007, 12:43 AM   #8
kladue
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Turner, Oregon, Oregon most of the time now
Posts: 2,306
Liked 47 Times on 43 Posts

Default

The open coil heater goes inside a 1-1/2" copper tube with a 2" copper tube around it to contain the wort. This should spread out the output from the open coil heater to the entire length of the inner copper pipe~ 12". As long as the flow is kept around .75-1 gpm the wort temperture should not reach the point of scorching as the surface area and limited wattage should limit liquid temperature rise. Down side of this method is the slow response of heater on state to temperature rise and overshoot after heater is shutdown from residual heat.

__________________
kladue is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2007, 01:39 AM   #9
brewman !
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,227
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

What kind of coil is it again ? Do you have any pictures ? I'd love to see it.

__________________

Getting back into brewing...

brewman ! is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2007, 02:11 AM   #10
kladue
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Turner, Oregon, Oregon most of the time now
Posts: 2,306
Liked 47 Times on 43 Posts

Default

Here is an example from a RV parts sales outlet, these elements are quite common in the rv industry as burnout resistant water heater elements.
http://www.rvwholesalers.com/catalog/product.php?productid=2186

__________________
kladue is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
$35 RIMS Heater? freddyb DIY Projects 21 01-26-2010 05:31 AM
Sugar Added to Wort, bad idea or really bad idea? gyrfalcon Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 10-29-2009 03:39 AM
Donate a RIMS heater photo?? The Pol DIY Projects 34 02-10-2009 05:55 PM
RIMS heater indianaroller DIY Projects 2 09-21-2008 07:15 PM
My RIMS idea... The Pol Equipment/Sanitation 6 01-15-2008 02:30 AM