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Old 03-15-2010, 03:04 AM   #1
bleak
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Default Commercial Grade Propane Hot Plate

I'm new here, although I've been reading posts for awhile now. This is my first post. I would like to thank everyone here for so generously sharing all the amazing information on this website.

I'm getting ready to renew my beer making activities, having made a few extract batches some years ago. I would like to delve into all-grain 5 gallon batches, but brewing outdoors really isn't an option. I ran across this commercial grade hot plate, and I was wondering if anyone here has used something like this.

http://www.stratusequipment.com/stockpots.html#begin

I believe that the SSP-18 model, at 21" wide putting out 90,000 B.T.U.s, could be purchased for around $350. Although it's quite a bit more expensive than outdoor propane burners, the capability of boiling indoors might make it worth the money in the long run. Thanks in advance for any of your thoughts.

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Old 03-15-2010, 02:44 PM   #2
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One of the guys I've brewed with used something very similar in his pizza place for brewing.

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Old 03-15-2010, 03:03 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleak View Post
I'm new here, although I've been reading posts for awhile now. This is my first post. I would like to thank everyone here for so generously sharing all the amazing information on this website.

I'm getting ready to renew my beer making activities, having made a few extract batches some years ago. I would like to delve into all-grain 5 gallon batches, but brewing outdoors really isn't an option. I ran across this commercial grade hot plate, and I was wondering if anyone here has used something like this.

http://www.stratusequipment.com/stockpots.html#begin

I believe that the SSP-18 model, at 21" wide putting out 90,000 B.T.U.s, could be purchased for around $350. Although it's quite a bit more expensive than outdoor propane burners, the capability of boiling indoors might make it worth the money in the long run. Thanks in advance for any of your thoughts.
I'll say it is alot more expensive than conventional propane burners. If you look at the SSP-18 spec sheet it is $1059 not $350. It also uses low pressure propane so you may need a low pressure regulator.
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Old 03-15-2010, 03:03 PM   #4
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I can't see how that burner would be any different than using the common turkey fryer burners if they are both burning propane. Using either indoors with bulk propane tanks is in violation of fire codes in most locals IIRC. Using or storing a bulk propane tank indoors is the issue, not the burner itself. With either, you would need adequate ventilation. The electric option might be a better way to go in your case.

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Old 03-15-2010, 03:46 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Catt22 View Post
I can't see how that burner would be any different than using the common turkey fryer burners if they are both burning propane. Using either indoors with bulk propane tanks is in violation of fire codes in most locals IIRC. Using or storing a bulk propane tank indoors is the issue, not the burner itself. With either, you would need adequate ventilation. The electric option might be a better way to go in your case.
+1 I wouldn't use that thing indoors but that's just me. Let your conscience be your guide.
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Old 03-15-2010, 03:53 PM   #6
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Pretty doubtful that it would fly with your local inspector if you did it with permits. Many people used to retrofit commercial kitchen stoves to fit in a home setting and then the industry caught on and made properly insulated and ventilated systems for home use.

Since people cook with indoor propane kitchen stoves it can work, but most likely you need an outdoor propane tank, proper ventilation and insulation. When your all done you will have spent enough money to buy a top of the line pilot brewing system most likely.

If you hook it up by yourself and burn down your house or asphyxiate someone, your insurance company will not be footing the bill.

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Old 03-15-2010, 08:58 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustguy View Post
I'll say it is alot more expensive than conventional propane burners. If you look at the SSP-18 spec sheet it is $1059 not $350. It also uses low pressure propane so you may need a low pressure regulator.
Although the MSRP is $1059, it is available for $350. That said, it looks like I'll be going with heatsticks. Thanks for your responses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by samc View Post
Pretty doubtful that it would fly with your local inspector if you did it with permits. Many people used to retrofit commercial kitchen stoves to fit in a home setting and then the industry caught on and made properly insulated and ventilated systems for home use.

Since people cook with indoor propane kitchen stoves it can work, but most likely you need an outdoor propane tank, proper ventilation and insulation. When your all done you will have spent enough money to buy a top of the line pilot brewing system most likely.

If you hook it up by yourself and burn down your house or asphyxiate someone, your insurance company will not be footing the bill.
If I were to electrocute myself and burn down my house with heatsticks I don't think my insurance company will be very responsive either. Anyway, it looks like electric is a much better risk. Thank you.
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