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Old 04-13-2014, 02:22 AM   #1
drhall23
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Default CO2 loss!?!?

I just finished assembling my keezer. I used a 7.2 cu ft freezer and added a collar to it. Yesterday I installed a 4 port manifold for CO2 distribution. I currently only have two kegs in my keezer. (And yes, the ports from the manifold are closed that are not connected to kegs). Today I noticed some minor leaking from the liquid lines at the shanks, nothing major. When I went to check on the leaking (just now) I found that the CO2 tank is completely empty and the newest keg doesn't not have any pressure in it. My first keg does, but also has the liquid line disconnected, since this was leaking most (O-rings to be replaced tomorrow). Temp of the keezer is just below 40'F.
Any one have any suggestions on what may have happened toy CO2 tank? It was 60% full.



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Old 04-13-2014, 02:39 AM   #2
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You have a CO2 leak somewhere. Manifolds, regulators, valves, disconnects, post orings, lid orings, PRV. All of these things can leak and you have to eliminate them one by one. First thing to do is fill your CO2 tank. Then turn off all valves to your kegs but leave the regulator valve open. This will pressurize your manifold and the tubing to it. Turn the CO2 tank valve off and watch the pressure gauge. If it drops you have a leak somewhere in that area. Find that leak and fix it. If/once that passes the test open the CO2 tank valve again, open one gas line to one keg, then close the CO2 tank valve again. If this line passes move on to the next, if not, find and fix the leak. Repeat until you have no more lines to test and the system doesn't leak. Remember that you can submerge your lines and even your manifold into a water bath to check for leaks. Don't submerge your gauges though. new orings may solve your problem.

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Old 04-13-2014, 03:14 AM   #3
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Yep that sounds like a leak. One way to check for leaks is make up some soapy water (starsan works) and spray it over any fittings. Leaks will make bubbles.

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Old 04-13-2014, 03:25 AM   #4
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If possible, just take the whole gas assembly (CO2 tank, lines, regulator, distributor, etc) and submerge in the bath tub. Just look for bubbles and you'll know where your leaks are.

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Old 04-13-2014, 02:21 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brdb View Post
If possible, just take the whole gas assembly (CO2 tank, lines, regulator, distributor, etc) and submerge in the bath tub. Just look for bubbles and you'll know where your leaks are.
I wouldn't recommend submerging the pressure gauges... most of them are not sealed and its just a paper backing inside.
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Old 04-13-2014, 02:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
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I wouldn't recommend submerging the pressure gauges... most of them are not sealed and its just a paper backing inside.
Yeah, don't do that. Even if they are metal disks they will rust. I've had cheap gauges that rusted inside just from condensation, submerging them is right out.
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Old 04-13-2014, 04:18 PM   #7
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When I checked my first build I put the (5#) tank with the regulator and all hoses attached in a 7.9 Gal ferment bucket and slowly filled with water. I stopped before the gauges. It was nice because I had no idea what I was doing and having the full working setup checked was nice. Turned out to be the last link in the chain as it were (the gas connector to the keg). My first ones were bought online and were only finger tight and an easy fix with a wrench. The last leak in the keg connectors I had to use plumbers teflon tape to fix it. Soapy water works also but I think water bath is easy for smaller leaks.

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Old 04-13-2014, 04:27 PM   #8
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Thanks for all the feedback.
I will try many if these ideas. I have to wait to get CO2 tomorrow though.... All local stores closed on Sunday. My guess is the connection to the keg because I did have proper pressure for a day... (25 psi when I hooked my new homemade brew keg up to begin carbonation).
Once I discovered the liquid leaks and began tinkering around with that, I'm guessing the gas connection to the 2nd keg loosened and the 1st keg is still pressurized.


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Old 04-13-2014, 06:14 PM   #9
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After replacing the O-rings on the liquid lines at the shanks, I ensured all connections were tight, and they are. My CO2 ball lock connector on the 2nd keg is a hard fit, had to really work to get it locked. I am guessing that this was not locked properly after tinkering the other day. Will verify after I get more CO2.... And probably a new ball lock connector.


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