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Old 12-24-2013, 01:46 AM   #21
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Can you actually open these things? I need to place a solid object inside a pressurized container.
I've got to know, what are you making??
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:11 AM   #22
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I've got to know, what are you making??
It's a science project on the effect of air pressure on the efficiency of a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine is an external combustion engine in which a difference in temperature causes the contraction and expansion of air inside the engine to move a piston. I'm increasing the pressure of the engine by placing the engine in a Cornelius keg.
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:28 AM   #23
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It's a science project on the effect of air pressure on the efficiency of a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine is an external combustion engine in which a difference in temperature causes the contraction and expansion of air inside the engine to move a piston. I'm increasing the pressure of the engine by placing the engine in a Cornelius keg.
Seems like you could use a corney initially at lower pressure while you try to find something that will work for a more advanced set of tests. It also gives you time to build the bunker to hide in when the vessel explodes!
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Old 12-24-2013, 01:36 PM   #24
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Seems like you could use a corney initially at lower pressure while you try to find something that will work for a more advanced set of tests. It also gives you time to build the bunker to hide in when the vessel explodes!
Yeah, a factor of two or three over atmospheric is probably enough to get good data for a test like this. (I am an experimental physicist, working with cryogenic systems, including Gifford-McMahon and pulse tube coolers and occasionally Stirling cycle coolers, which are Stirling engines run in reverse). 15 and 30 psi is enough for initial tests, before you decide if it's worth going to higher pressures.

I assume that you won't be running a combustion source inside the pressure vessel - firstly air under pressure will greatly increase the rate of combustion, possible nullifying your experiment, and secondly, at higher partial pressures of oxygen (this includes pressurized air) there's a greater risk of other components of the system igniting. This also applies to a lesser extent to electrical components if there's a risk of sparks.

If you are doing a university type research project, then testing under moderate vacuum would also be good to do, and somewhat safer than high pressure. You should also investigate the local safety regulations about pressure vessels - I don't know about the US, but in the UK, a vessel intended to operate at over 5 bar (75psi) has to be certified, and any modifications have to be certified separately. Cornies don't usually have to, as the design operating pressure is below 5 bar, although they are tested higher.
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:26 PM   #25
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Yeah, a factor of two or three over atmospheric is probably enough to get good data for a test like this. (I am an experimental physicist, working with cryogenic systems, including Gifford-McMahon and pulse tube coolers and occasionally Stirling cycle coolers, which are Stirling engines run in reverse). 15 and 30 psi is enough for initial tests, before you decide if it's worth going to higher pressures.

I assume that you won't be running a combustion source inside the pressure vessel - firstly air under pressure will greatly increase the rate of combustion, possible nullifying your experiment, and secondly, at higher partial pressures of oxygen (this includes pressurized air) there's a greater risk of other components of the system igniting. This also applies to a lesser extent to electrical components if there's a risk of sparks.

If you are doing a university type research project, then testing under moderate vacuum would also be good to do, and somewhat safer than high pressure. You should also investigate the local safety regulations about pressure vessels - I don't know about the US, but in the UK, a vessel intended to operate at over 5 bar (75psi) has to be certified, and any modifications have to be certified separately. Cornies don't usually have to, as the design operating pressure is below 5 bar, although they are tested higher.
I'm using an LTD Stirling engine that can run on hot water.
California counts anything that has a pressure above 15 psi as a "tank."
I don't know why nothing applies on Corny kegs.
I want to see a logarithmic curve, and I need at least five bar to show that.

By the way, are Corny kegs ASME rated? I read in one post that they are, in which case they should be fine until 130 psi.
I would buy a pressure vessel if I could find one.
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