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Old 01-31-2013, 10:47 AM   #1
rbenn
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Default Best water solution

I've been recently looking into fine tuning my water source for my brewing. Currently I use a well which provides me hard water ( I'm yet to have it sent out and be analysed). I was thinking about getting a Reverse Osmosis Filter system, but they seem to be pretty pricey. What results has everyone had with filtering or distilling water? Is it is easier/cheaper to just buy distilled water and "cut" it with my well water?



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Old 01-31-2013, 11:42 AM   #2
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The cheapest store bought water is around 0.50 cents per gallon. I use maybe 10 gallons to make 5 gallons of beer. I brew about 10x a year. Local water is closer to dollar per gallon or 2$ in gas to get $0.50 water. So it's at least $70 a year to buy water. Assuming I have enough containers and feel like lugging water.

RO system for just brewing could cost as little as 1year's worth of water.



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Old 01-31-2013, 12:30 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbenn View Post
I've been recently looking into fine tuning my water source for my brewing. Currently I use a well which provides me hard water ( I'm yet to have it sent out and be analysed). I was thinking about getting a Reverse Osmosis Filter system, but they seem to be pretty pricey. What results has everyone had with filtering or distilling water? Is it is easier/cheaper to just buy distilled water and "cut" it with my well water?
Until you know what's in your water and how hard it is, I wouldn't mess with it.
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Old 01-31-2013, 03:02 PM   #4
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Until you know what's in your water and how hard it is, I wouldn't mess with it.
Correct. No point changing something until you know what you have. RO filters are great, but you can usually do mineral additions to get the correct ratios.

Start with getting your water tested to see what you'll need to do.
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Old 01-31-2013, 06:10 PM   #5
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Thanks for the advise guys. I will start with the water profile sample and see where that takes me.

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Old 01-31-2013, 07:43 PM   #6
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Southwest Michigan? I'm guessing you will be high in alkalinity...

An RO system of sufficient size for homebrewing and then some could cost like $130 or so. I'm seriously thinking about getting one. It would make it easier to brew up pale ales without having to add a bunch of acid or go find some water to mix with mine.

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Old 01-31-2013, 07:58 PM   #7
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You've already said your water is hard. Why spend $30-$40 on a test that could just go towards a RO system?

I just bought this one. $154 It comes with a pressure tank, faucet, permeate pump, all the fittings, even enough line to run water to the fridge for the icemaker. Install took maybe 1 hour, you just push the hose into the fittings.
http://www.airwaterice.com/product/1MAX50/Reverse-Osmosis-Under-Sink-RO.html

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Old 02-01-2013, 05:35 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grathan View Post
You've already said your water is hard. Why spend $30-$40 on a test that could just go towards a RO system?

I just bought this one. $154 It comes with a pressure tank, faucet, permeate pump, all the fittings, even enough line to run water to the fridge for the icemaker. Install took maybe 1 hour, you just push the hose into the fittings.
http://www.airwaterice.com/product/1MAX50/Reverse-Osmosis-Under-Sink-RO.html
That is a really good one at a great price. I have one just like that but I have standard size prefilters, which are what you replace every year. It makes it a little cheaper to replace. However, that pump speeds thing up by being able to use a air pressurized tank. I am thinking of getting a 40 gallon well pressurized tank, same thing but bigger, putting a T in the line and adding it. The small tank would go to current drinking water and ice making. The large tank would go to a outlet for brewing.
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:17 AM   #9
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I ended up skipping the water profile and just got a bulk reef supply 4 stage RO with DI. I know my water is high in iron and bicarbonate so no reason to check. Its a little slow filling up my 5 gallon carboys, but not bad to just let it run for a couple hours or so. I also bought some bulk chemicals from brs, hopefully they are alright for human consumption lol.

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Old 02-11-2013, 01:38 PM   #10
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Good for you. What chemicals did you buy? Get a TDS meter too if you haven't already. There are about $15 and measure total dissolved solids. It will give a good performance indicator of how well the RO system is working. My tap water is at about 256 ppm (mostly bicarb) and the RO water is about 18.



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