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-   -   Bayou Classic SQ14 Problem? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/bayou-classic-sq14-problem-221671/)

lmnop 01-31-2011 12:09 AM

Bayou Classic SQ14 Problem?
 
I put 5.5 gal into a SS kettle today, took it out into the garage for my first "outside" brew day, and sparked up the SQ14 on full blast at right around 3pm. By 4:30pm the water temp was all the way up to 80 degrees F, and I gave up on getting to brew. I have a regular sized propane tank, which was open to full, the regulator that came with the burner was wide open on. I checked the whole set-up for leaks the day I bought it and set it up, and again today, it was totally fine. Obviously the garage door was open, but I searched and apparently 40F isn't too cold to consider brewing. The reviews section has people talking about using this same burner to boil more water in around half the time. After being on full for 90 mins the little fins that hold up the kettle were warm, but not even hot to the touch. The flame was clear and steady and blue, and I set up a wind-break with some tin foil that kept the flames protected, they hardly danced at all.


I'm very frustrated, this is the third time something has come up to stop me brewing this batch, and it might be the last chance I have to brew for a while. Can anyone suggest what might be causing my burner to be so sucky?

ihomebrewing 01-31-2011 12:50 AM

Sometimes my burners do that.
I relieve all the residual pressure by unhooking it all, and opening the valves.

Next I attach the regulator to the tank again.

Make sure all your valves are closed, and if you have an adjustable regulator, turn it to the lowest setting.

Open the propane valve fully, then (if you have an adjustable regulator) turn it up to max.

Now you are ready to open the burner valve, and light it up.

You should operate at full power.

megalomani 01-31-2011 12:57 AM

Used the same burner for the first time today. It seemed to take longer to get a boil than i expected but mine did fine. I spent some time messing with the air manifold to get a strong blue flame. It blew itself out a couple of times while I was doing that

Raider-11 01-31-2011 01:11 AM

Can you see the flame it should be about an inch tall and not leaping off the tips, also check the air control vent has'nt moved on you because without enough air your flame may look hot but may only be heating enough to simmer water not boil it, open the vent until you see the flames leaping off the tips then close the vent just enough that the flame is touching the tip and if you have to set up some plywood in a V as a wind break just make sure its secure and won't fall over

sudsmcgee 01-31-2011 01:15 AM

I think you ran into the safety valve issue. Make sure you open the tank valve BEFORE you open the regulator valve, otherwise it limits flow because it thinks there is a leak.

Also, make sure your air/gas ratio is adjusted correctly. It sounds like it might be, but make sure.

Bitterbrush 01-31-2011 01:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sudsmcgee (Post 2598778)
I think you ran into the safety valve issue. Make sure you open the tank valve BEFORE you open the regulator valve, otherwise it limits flow because it thinks there is a leak.

Also, make sure your air/gas ratio is adjusted correctly. It sounds like it might be, but make sure.

+1, and make sure your connection to the tank is screwed in tight.

lmnop 01-31-2011 11:06 AM

That fixed it! Thanks!

I know that the turning-on order is open gas then open regulator, but when I want to turn the burner off, do I turn off the regulator then the gas, or turn off the gas then the regulator?

Quote:

Originally Posted by ihomebrewing (Post 2598703)
Sometimes my burners do that.
I relieve all the residual pressure by unhooking it all, and opening the valves.

Next I attach the regulator to the tank again.

Make sure all your valves are closed, and if you have an adjustable regulator, turn it to the lowest setting.

Open the propane valve fully, then (if you have an adjustable regulator) turn it up to max.

Now you are ready to open the burner valve, and light it up.

You should operate at full power.


ChuckO 01-31-2011 12:13 PM

Turn off the gas at the tank, then close the regulator after the flame has died.

Catt22 01-31-2011 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChuckO (Post 2599815)
Turn off the gas at the tank, then close the regulator after the flame has died.

+1 This is the proper sequence. When initially opening the tank valve, just crack it a little for a moment, then open it all the way. Opening the tank valve suddenly can sometimes cause the anti-surge valve to trip. This is more likely to occur when feeding a gas rail or a long supply hose due to the increased volume. It's less likely with a relatively short supply hose such as the stock one on the SQ-14.

lmnop 01-31-2011 08:56 PM

Super, thanks guys!


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